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Previously on "99% fully remote roles"

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  • Lance
    replied
    Originally posted by Robinho View Post

    Since when were Indians semi-skilled?
    who mentioned Indians?
    Outsourcers could be anywhere in the world, which I thought was you point TBH, but are almost always the cheaper resource at their locality.
    Outsourcing is generally a cost cutting game so using cheap resource is a must. Hence they are almost always crap (semi-skilled)


    As a side note..... the way to get value from your outsource provider is to ensure they provide the best skilled people they can afford. I have come across some very good outsourced resource, but they are usually very siloed, and get moved on to more important clients.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robinho
    replied
    Originally posted by _V_ View Post

    Oddly phrased question?

    Like Brits and indeed anyone from anywhere, some are highly skilled, others not so much. The more you pay, the higher the probability that a client might catch the cream of the crop, but since offshoring is usually about cutting costs to the bone, the outcome is definitely a low skill workforce doing the minimum possible.
    It was implied that i was worried about losing my job to semi-skilled Indians, but of course there are highly skilled Indians, and they are much cheaper than highly skilled UK workers.

    And this is the point about 100% remote work, you're not necessarily providing much advantage over an Indian. So in time the increase in remote gigs created by COVID may dry up as companies realise they can just offshore to a greater extent.

    Leave a comment:


  • _V_
    replied
    Originally posted by Robinho View Post

    Since when were Indians semi-skilled?
    Oddly phrased question?

    Like Brits and indeed anyone from anywhere, some are highly skilled, others not so much. The more you pay, the higher the probability that a client might catch the cream of the crop, but since offshoring is usually about cutting costs to the bone, the outcome is definitely a low skill workforce doing the minimum possible.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robinho
    replied
    Originally posted by Lance View Post
    Of course he may be comparing himself to an offshore bod, which may be very different to your scenario.
    The very fact that he thinks his job is at risk from semi-skilled cheap resources is telling.
    Since when were Indians semi-skilled?

    Leave a comment:


  • Lance
    replied
    Originally posted by northernladuk View Post

    You can't compare a highly skilled on shore contractor with tens of years delivering exactly what a client needs to an offshore bod just because neither attend an office.
    this is very true.

    Of course he may be comparing himself to an offshore bod, which may be very different to your scenario.
    The very fact that he thinks his job is at risk from semi-skilled cheap resources is telling.

    Leave a comment:


  • northernladuk
    replied
    Originally posted by Robinho View Post

    You also have to wonder whether in time, it will all just result in a lot of outsourcing to India etc. If you're not actually going into the office, it's possibly only a superior grasp of the language that puts you ahead of an Indian.
    It's the skills and knowledge they need. That's the fundamental argument as to why even at the prices offshoring roles is not good value for money. They local contractors (in theory) should reassuringly expensive.

    You can't compare a highly skilled on shore contractor with tens of years delivering exactly what a client needs to an offshore bod just because neither attend an office.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robinho
    replied
    I had a 100% remote job for almost 4 years (inside) until COVID derailed it.


    It was brilliant, spent a lot of time in Australia. The rate wasn't great but well worth it for the perks. However i did work onsite for the first 6 months and made 100% remote a condition of extensions. It seems getting a role immediately 100% remote is a lot harder than easing in to it.

    I live abroad now and am in a hybrid role (based out here) at the minute but it will only be a short gig.

    In theory COVID has made remote work a lot more common, but the downside is companies have cottoned on to people working abroad and are specifically requesting UK-based which largely usurps the point, certainly for me anyway.

    You also have to wonder whether in time, it will all just result in a lot of outsourcing to India etc. If you're not actually going into the office, it's possibly only a superior grasp of the language that puts you ahead of an Indian.

    Leave a comment:


  • d000hg
    replied
    Originally posted by PCTNN View Post

    No, I'll keep working for home for a salary/day rate that is at least the same as if I was going in the office.

    I'll leave those contracts for suckers like yourself.
    I've been WFH since day 1 of contracting over a decade ago... but good for you thinking you're clever.

    Leave a comment:


  • PCTNN
    replied
    Originally posted by d000hg View Post
    Well go into the office then, you get paid more and save on those expensive costs.
    No, I'll keep working for home for a salary/day rate that is at least the same as if I was going in the office.

    I'll leave those contracts for suckers like yourself.

    Leave a comment:


  • ladymuck
    replied
    Originally posted by jmo21 View Post
    Has anyone accepted a "1/2 days a week in the office" role recently?

    Do those 1/2 days have to be the same days as everyone else?

    I contracted for a big bank when they went to hybrid office/flexi-hours/hot desk for permies and contractors a few years back, and the days I was in the office, there was often no-one from my team there, rendering it entirely pointless. Team meetings were always on the phone as people were WFH or in other office locations.

    Interesting times ahead I think.
    The last time I worked for a bank, I only turned up to the office if it fitted in with my social life

    Leave a comment:


  • d000hg
    replied
    Originally posted by PCTNN View Post
    If anything they should pay more for home working because I'm using my monitors, my office chair, my electricity/internet/heating. I'll say that the next time someone tries to offer peanuts. Let's see how it goes
    Well go into the office then, you get paid more and save on those expensive costs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paralytic
    replied
    Originally posted by jmo21 View Post
    Has anyone accepted a "1/2 days a week in the office" role recently?

    Do those 1/2 days have to be the same days as everyone else?

    I contracted for a big bank when they went to hybrid office/flexi-hours/hot desk for permies and contractors a few years back, and the days I was in the office, there was often no-one from my team there, rendering it entirely pointless. Team meetings were always on the phone as people were WFH or in other office locations.

    Interesting times ahead I think.
    My client has moved to a hybrid working model. They're recommended people go into the office a day or two a month, and to align those days with other members of the local team.

    But because the wider team is spread over multiple locations (UK and off-shore) what is happening (for those that have done this - i've avoided it so far) is that people are in the office and on Zoom calls all day - so no different to WFH.

    Leave a comment:


  • jmo21
    replied
    Has anyone accepted a "1/2 days a week in the office" role recently?

    Do those 1/2 days have to be the same days as everyone else?

    I contracted for a big bank when they went to hybrid office/flexi-hours/hot desk for permies and contractors a few years back, and the days I was in the office, there was often no-one from my team there, rendering it entirely pointless. Team meetings were always on the phone as people were WFH or in other office locations.

    Interesting times ahead I think.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paralytic
    replied
    Originally posted by PCTNN View Post

    I've had calls for 2 jobs (both internal HR reps, not agency pimps) where they said "the salary is only £X because, you know, we are letting you work from home".
    I'd call their bluff and say you're willing to come into the office, "so what's the salary now?". When they say thats not an option, tell them they're not "letting you work from home" then, are they, but that's it's a stipulation.

    Leave a comment:


  • SteelyDan
    replied
    Originally posted by PCTNN View Post

    I've had calls for 2 jobs (both internal HR reps, not agency pimps) where they said "the salary is only £X because, you know, we are letting you work from home".

    If anything they should pay more for home working because I'm using my monitors, my office chair, my electricity/internet/heating. I'll say that the next time someone tries to offer peanuts. Let's see how it goes
    Have seen a couple of roles advertised recently by 'Haze'...as 'remote rate', which of course was lower than you might expect for those particular roles. Always looking for an angle of sorts these agents.

    Leave a comment:

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