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Why Millennials Are Leaving Six-Figure Tech Jobs

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    #21
    Originally posted by Andy2 View Post
    one of the persons in the videos says reason for leaving that ' as one project finished another started'
    WTF did they expect. Looks to me some people joined tech but were not suited for it.
    A lot of it is this relentless agile sprint nonsense.

    These sprints are mostly artificial deadlines created every two weeks to pile on the pressure.

    In reality you only have a handful of real deadlines per year, but the sprints are constant and never ending.

    And there is daily monitoring via standup/scrum meetings.

    This is all great for companies, they get more out of developers and engineers. But it just seems like a recipe for burnout to me.

    It wasn't always like this in IT, used to be more chilled and laid back, weekly progress meetings. A month or more between releases.
    Last edited by Fraidycat; 8 June 2021, 18:59.

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      #22
      Originally posted by AtW View Post

      Paid £100 for a room back in 2020, if they can't afford their rents they should either earn more money or find cheaper place, maybe both.
      was the landlord getting a bit of action on the side with that?

      Originally posted by Fraidycat View Post

      A lot of it is this relentless agile sprint nonsense.

      These sprints are mostly artificial deadlines created every two weeks to pile on the pressure.

      In reality you only have a handful of real deadlines per year, but the sprints are constant and never ending.

      And there is daily monitoring via standup/scrum meetings.

      This is all great for companies, they get more out of developers and engineers. But it just seems like a recipe for burnout to me.

      It wasn't always like this in IT, used to be more chilled and laid back, weekly progress meetings. A month or more between releases.
      that sounds a bit more like it, low pay, toxic work environments, more focus on delivery.

      the last two generations are a bit more focussed on purpose, want to make a change. the world doesn't seem to work just like that and they become estranged with society.

      Overall I believe they are better then the previous generations in terms of emotional cognition, technical ability. They are just caught between a rock and a hard place: rigid world created to server the very few at the top and two economic crisis that have made purchasing power ever decreasing for the previous 20 years.

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        #23
        Originally posted by Whorty View Post

        I do find it funny that that generation is always complaining that they can't afford a house, the 'boomers' have it all etc etc .... how do they think we got there? We worked stupid hours, in crap jobs, for crap companies, whilst living in rented shared housing during the early years of our careers to get where we are now. Problem seems to be that the current generation want it all now, and don't seem to think they have to work for it.

        I've lived in some pretty sh*tty places and worked feck loads of hours. Maybe some of these kids need to moan less, and work more
        I don't think that's what most people did. I didn't; I got a job out of uni in 2003 paying £17k, rented for a couple of years then got a 95% mortgage.
        My parents didn't; they bought a house for £4000 which meant scraping every penny back when lenders would only give 3X your salary, did it up, sold and moved up.

        I don't know anyone who did what you describe in fact, and they virtually all have owned houses since quite young ages.

        Look at house price as a multiplier of salary over the decades. It can't be too far off the mark to say house prices increase 5-10% year on year over the last 50+years, salaries certainly haven't.
        Originally posted by MaryPoppins
        I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
        Originally posted by vetran
        Urine is quite nourishing

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          #24
          Originally posted by d000hg View Post
          I don't think that's what most people did. I didn't; I got a job out of uni in 2003 paying £17k, rented for a couple of years then got a 95% mortgage.
          My parents didn't; they bought a house for £4000 which meant scraping every penny back when lenders would only give 3X your salary, did it up, sold and moved up.

          I don't know anyone who did what you describe in fact, and they virtually all have owned houses since quite young ages.

          Look at house price as a multiplier of salary over the decades. It can't be too far off the mark to say house prices increase 5-10% year on year over the last 50+years, salaries certainly haven't.
          Half way decent 3-4 bed house (in Slough not Windsor, Ascot, Marlow or Maidehead) is ~ £500k 10 times most professionals salary.
          "If you didn't do anything that wasn't good for you it would be a very dull life. What are you gonna do? Everything that is pleasant in life is dangerous."

          I want to see the hand of history on his collar.

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            #25
            Originally posted by d000hg View Post
            I don't think that's what most people did. I didn't; I got a job out of uni in 2003 paying £17k, rented for a couple of years then got a 95% mortgage.
            My parents didn't; they bought a house for £4000 which meant scraping every penny back when lenders would only give 3X your salary, did it up, sold and moved up.

            I don't know anyone who did what you describe in fact, and they virtually all have owned houses since quite young ages.

            Look at house price as a multiplier of salary over the decades. It can't be too far off the mark to say house prices increase 5-10% year on year over the last 50+years, salaries certainly haven't.
            Some of us live or lived in London. So while you get paid more housing costs much more in comparison to the salary premium you get.
            ​​
            The Americans moaning about work/life balance also lived in expensive cities.
            "You’re just a bad memory who doesn’t know when to go away" JR

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              #26
              another opinion to bring to the thread.

              most of the times I've found him quite close to the truth although the message sometimes has too much emotion attached to it

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                #27
                Originally posted by ladymuck View Post

                I think I'm Gen X, whatever that means. Who the hell came up with such nonsense?
                We're the latch key kids. Brought up by boomer parents. That's why were so self-reliant and sensible.

                I bought my first house (with my wife) about a year after starting work (way oop north, so it was cheap). Then moved with relocation assistance down south, during the midst of a housing recession and picked up a bargain. Never looked back.

                I only had one crap job in my career. Working for crapita. I left after a year. I only took it because it was close to home and sprog 2 was on its way. Turns out the maternity hospital was a short walk away from the offices. Terrible terrible place. Full of ex-local government civil servants.
                Down with racism. Long live miscegenation!

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                  #28
                  Originally posted by SueEllen View Post

                  If you know the Pre-Covid rents in a shared house, even a crap one, you would understand why they were complaining.
                  Are they any different to our day, in real terms? And a lot more choice these days, and 'luxuries'* in the houses.

                  Mate of mine was in a shared house and the only shower was on the landing, with a flimsy bath curtain around it. You had to warn everyone in the (mixed sex) house if you was going for a shower. He was mid 20's at the time, although he did meet his future wife in that house share so maybe the shower arrangement wasn't all bad

                  * washing machine, dish washer, micro wave etc etc
                  I am what I drink, and I'm a bitter man

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                    #29
                    Originally posted by Fraidycat View Post

                    A lot of it is this relentless agile sprint nonsense.

                    These sprints are mostly artificial deadlines created every two weeks to pile on the pressure.

                    In reality you only have a handful of real deadlines per year, but the sprints are constant and never ending.

                    And there is daily monitoring via standup/scrum meetings.

                    This is all great for companies, they get more out of developers and engineers. But it just seems like a recipe for burnout to me.

                    It wasn't always like this in IT, used to be more chilled and laid back, weekly progress meetings. A month or more between releases.
                    If that's what it feels like then they're doing it wrong.

                    What's in the sprint should be decided by the devs and achievable by the end, based on previous experience of how much can be done. It's not to add pressure and it's specifically to avoid burnout by ensuring a manageable workload that can be sustained over time.

                    They are constant because we're always looking to improve and it provides regular points to stop and think about that as well as providing a chunk of 'potentially releasable functionality'. It's not to put pressure on the devs.

                    Daily stand ups are there because communication is good and it gives the devs the chance to raise issues that either the team can help with or someone else needs to go away and get sorted while they focus on the dev.

                    Scrum was designed to avoid the big problems with waterfall delivery where everything was late and what was delivered was never what the customer wanted, at that point.
                    It was designed to be led by the devs, deciding how much work could be done, suggesting improvements to the process and their working lives and insulating them from pressure exerted by project managers to meet some arbitrary deadline that was unachievable.

                    Don't blame the methodology for the implementation.




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                      #30
                      Originally posted by d000hg View Post
                      I don't think that's what most people did. I didn't; I got a job out of uni in 2003 paying £17k, rented for a couple of years then got a 95% mortgage.
                      My parents didn't; they bought a house for £4000 which meant scraping every penny back when lenders would only give 3X your salary, did it up, sold and moved up.

                      I don't know anyone who did what you describe in fact, and they virtually all have owned houses since quite young ages.

                      Look at house price as a multiplier of salary over the decades. It can't be too far off the mark to say house prices increase 5-10% year on year over the last 50+years, salaries certainly haven't.
                      Interesting, as all of my peers in my social circle did this. We did all buy our own places (usually very small flat in less smart part of town) before we reached 30, but we lived in some pretty ropey places in order to save enough money. Expectations seemed to be higher these days, that you can buy a big house in the best part of town as your first property. And earn big bucks, working only 35 hours a week, for a charity who are making the world a much better place
                      I am what I drink, and I'm a bitter man

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