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Indian recruitment consultancies operating in the UK

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    Originally posted by PerfectStorm View Post

    ...." and "would I sit next to you for a beer". I'd argue both of those are more important than knowing what artefacts go into a scrum ceremony.
    My current contract started on that basis several years ago, with some people I'd happily go for a beer with (and the feeling was mutual). Which was a refreshing change from previous contracts.

    I do wonder if this social characteristic is still prized by interviewers for roles that are predominantly remote, or if the tendency these days is to select on a transactional basis.

    If transactional, then that suggests we are moving closer to the Indian system integrator recruiting model.

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      Originally posted by lecyclist View Post
      I do wonder if this social characteristic is still prized by interviewers for roles that are predominantly remote, or if the tendency these days is to select on a transactional basis.
      I just bagged a contract predominantly remote (1 day a month in the office) and the first thing the interviewer said to me was how relieved he was that I was doing the zoom interview dressed in a t-shirt rather than the suit and tie of the folks he had interviewed until then. He was wearing a t-shirt as well so I guess that's your social connection right there.

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        Originally posted by PCTNN View Post

        I just bagged a contract predominantly remote (1 day a month in the office) and the first thing the interviewer said to me was how relieved he was that I was doing the zoom interview dressed in a t-shirt rather than the suit and tie of the folks he had interviewed until then. He was wearing a t-shirt as well so I guess that's your social connection right there.
        Did you have trousers on?

        At a previous client, one of the managers was a bit of an arse and would ask interviewees to prove they were fully dressed by standing up.

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          Originally posted by lecyclist View Post

          My current contract started on that basis several years ago, with some people I'd happily go for a beer with (and the feeling was mutual). Which was a refreshing change from previous contracts.

          I do wonder if this social characteristic is still prized by interviewers for roles that are predominantly remote, or if the tendency these days is to select on a transactional basis.

          If transactional, then that suggests we are moving closer to the Indian system integrator recruiting model.
          The Beer Test is still king in my view as I have to sit on Teams calls with such people every day - and I'd rather sit on a call with someone I get on with on a personal level than a robot "head of BA" scrum master or similar.

          And sure enough, when everyone met up after 2 years of remote, you knew exactly which ones you'd like to have a beer with.
          ⭐️ Gold Star Contractor

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            Originally posted by TheDude View Post

            I have found that in interviews conducted from India the interviewers tend to ask questions incredibly specific to the language/framework/platform in question rather than try to determine the candidates level of competence and experience.

            It leaves me with an uncomfortable feeling that the interviewers don't really know what they are talking about.
            I was interviewed a couple of years ago by a person who clearly had a pre-printed question list that he read out. He'd very little idea what he was talking about.
            After a couple of questions, he asked a very specific question that I recognised. I replied with "The answer on your sheet will be something like the following, but it's wrong. I then told him what was on his sheet. I started to tell him that it would only work in theory, never in practice. I went into a bit of detail as to why, but he said I had given the correct answer at first and didn't need to say anything else.
            {emotionless greeting}

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