• Visitors can check out the Forum FAQ by clicking this link. You have to register before you can post: click the REGISTER link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. View our Forum Privacy Policy.

Reply to: Lazy Older Men

Collapse

You are not logged in or you do not have permission to access this page. This could be due to one of several reasons:

  • You are not logged in. If you are already registered, fill in the form below to log in, or follow the "Sign Up" link to register a new account.
  • You may not have sufficient privileges to access this page. Are you trying to edit someone else's post, access administrative features or some other privileged system?
  • If you are trying to post, the administrator may have disabled your account, or it may be awaiting activation.

Previously on "Lazy Older Men"

Collapse

  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by RSoles View Post
    And don't get me started on trying to read the bands on Metal oxide resistors......
    Indeed not, I have one of those headband magnifier thingies and a nice tungsten desk lamp in order to have half a chance of reading & making sense of those, especially the blue bodied six band examples.

    Still have to use the meter to make sure I've read the damn things from the correct end.

    Originally posted by vetran View Post

    I agree you need the right tools.

    buy one of these

    Click image for larger version

Name:	DDB44B34-51B2-4EA9-A150-17EADC56AC83-huge.jpg
Views:	65
Size:	100.2 KB
ID:	4219953

    and if that doesn't work

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereo_microscope
    Got 'em both, though the stereo microscope was "liberated", being of little further use.

    I do miss the dear dead days so far beyond recall when a quarter watt resistor was carbon comp, big, and had at most 4 bands on it and my eyes still worked properly.

    Leave a comment:


  • vetran
    replied
    Originally posted by Protagoras View Post

    Time to to get a good illuminated magnifier and modern soldering station. I worked as an electronics design engineer for the first decade of my career and have taken up electronics again in my semi-retirement but needed help to see the components. It's now so much easier to source components, get PCBs made, afford test equipment. It's great fun!

    Decision making.
    - 2020, retired, but not taking pension, owing to attending too many funerals of those younger than me
    - 2022, started working part time, fully remote to mitigate the effects of inflation and top up pension

    Thanks to the OP for the idea. I can now self-identify as a 'Lazy Older Man'.
    I agree you need the right tools.

    buy one of these

    Click image for larger version

Name:	DDB44B34-51B2-4EA9-A150-17EADC56AC83-huge.jpg
Views:	65
Size:	100.2 KB
ID:	4219953

    and if that doesn't work

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereo_microscope

    Leave a comment:


  • RSoles
    replied
    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post
    I can't see the components on modern stuff any more.
    And don't get me started on trying to read the bands on Metal oxide resistors......

    Leave a comment:


  • Protagoras
    replied
    Originally posted by xoggoth View Post
    I used to be into electronics as a hobbiest until the components got too damn small to solder.
    Time to to get a good illuminated magnifier and modern soldering station. I worked as an electronics design engineer for the first decade of my career and have taken up electronics again in my semi-retirement but needed help to see the components. It's now so much easier to source components, get PCBs made, afford test equipment. It's great fun!

    Decision making.
    - 2020, retired, but not taking pension, owing to attending too many funerals of those younger than me
    - 2022, started working part time, fully remote to mitigate the effects of inflation and top up pension

    Thanks to the OP for the idea. I can now self-identify as a 'Lazy Older Man'.

    Leave a comment:


  • vetran
    replied
    Originally posted by xoggoth View Post

    I used to be into electronics as a hobbiest until the components got too damn small to solder. As for code, I still do HTML, jscript and PHP for small business website and my mappy stuff, otherwise just things in Excel VBA.
    surprisingly you don't need much to be outstanding

    Leave a comment:


  • vetran
    replied
    Originally posted by courtg9000 View Post
    The other thing to bear in mind is that ill health seems to be hitting younger too. Allegedly it only used to happen over 50. Back in the day it seemed to be only either sports injuries or car smashes that did that.
    The number of people I know in my own age bracket (high end of mid-forties) who are experiencing like I have some very serious health (in some cases career terminating and life-changing) issues is actually quite high IMO. Quite a few heart attacks and other serious stuff, liver, kidney, neurological stuff.
    sadly plenty pass in their forties over the years its just not as common as in their 70s or as it was with less advanced medical science.

    https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/d...land+and+Wales

    2 mates have had heart attacks in their 40s but survived due to stents and cpr. Another was dead in his thirties (faulty heart from birth).

    Leave a comment:


  • xoggoth
    replied
    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post
    Gisajob, gowon, gisajob, I could do that.

    Oddly enough I torture myself by looking for local jobs in electronics.

    I can't see the components on modern stuff any more.

    Haven't written a line of code in 4 or 5 years, so that's out too.
    I used to be into electronics as a hobbiest until the components got too damn small to solder. As for code, I still do HTML, jscript and PHP for small business website and my mappy stuff, otherwise just things in Excel VBA.

    Leave a comment:


  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by SueEllen View Post

    There are loads of hospitality places who need front and back of house staff. Hours are tulip though.

    Or he could become a cleaner as according to moans on Mumsnet they are all upping their prices and sacking very disgusting clients.

    Or a gardener but it depends where you are.
    Originally posted by Zigenare View Post

    With *your* people skills might I suggest you apply for a job at your local Wetherspoons?
    People skills wot people skills?

    And how exactly did the multiquote thing actually work on this post?

    It's a fecking miracle I tell you, a miracle.

    'Tis even more remarkable since, as far as I'm aware, I didn't click on multiquote in the first place.

    <cue Outer Limits music>
    Last edited by DoctorStrangelove; 1 June 2022, 22:24.

    Leave a comment:


  • SueEllen
    replied
    Originally posted by Zigenare View Post

    With *your* people skills might I suggest you apply for a job at your local Wetherspoons?
    There are loads of hospitality places who need front and back of house staff. Hours are tulip though.

    Or he could become a cleaner as according to moans on Mumsnet they are all upping their prices and sacking very disgusting clients.

    Or a gardener but it depends where you are.

    Leave a comment:


  • SueEllen
    replied
    Originally posted by courtg9000 View Post
    The other thing to bear in mind is that ill health seems to be hitting younger too. Allegedly it only used to happen over 50. Back in the day it seemed to be only either sports injuries or car smashes that did that.
    The number of people I know in my own age bracket (high end of mid-forties) who are experiencing like I have some very serious health (in some cases career terminating and life-changing) issues is actually quite high IMO. Quite a few heart attacks and other serious stuff, liver, kidney, neurological stuff.
    I was talking to an older neighbour about that and she noted that people who were 10+ years older than her use to get seriously ill and die e.g. were finally diagnosed with something they had been suffering with symptoms for years then died between their late 50s to mid-60s.

    However now everyone gets diagnosed earlier like her e.g. mid-40s to 50s so can struggle on longer with their illnesses.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zigenare
    replied
    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post
    Gisajob, gowon, gisajob, I could do that.

    Oddly enough I torture myself by looking for local jobs in electronics.

    I can't see the components on modern stuff any more.

    Haven't written a line of code in 4 or 5 years, so that's out too.
    With *your* people skills might I suggest you apply for a job at your local Wetherspoons?

    Leave a comment:


  • courtg9000
    replied
    The other thing to bear in mind is that ill health seems to be hitting younger too. Allegedly it only used to happen over 50. Back in the day it seemed to be only either sports injuries or car smashes that did that.
    The number of people I know in my own age bracket (high end of mid-forties) who are experiencing like I have some very serious health (in some cases career terminating and life-changing) issues is actually quite high IMO. Quite a few heart attacks and other serious stuff, liver, kidney, neurological stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Gisajob, gowon, gisajob, I could do that.

    Oddly enough I torture myself by looking for local jobs in electronics.

    I can't see the components on modern stuff any more.

    Haven't written a line of code in 4 or 5 years, so that's out too.

    Leave a comment:


  • d000hg
    replied
    Good on him, and good on his employer.

    Leave a comment:


  • SueEllen
    replied
    Back on subject.

    https://metro.co.uk/2022/05/31/pensi...osts-16742542/

    A 78-year-old pensioner has decided to return to working 40 hours a week to keep up with the cost of living crisis.

    Maurice Taylor, from Peterborough in Cambridgeshire, retired from a career in sales and project management in 2012.

    But, like many other people in the UK, Maurice became worried about his expenses going up amid energy supply problems and skyrocketing inflation.

    So he decided to apply for a job to ‘future-proof his existence’, he told the BBC.

    He ended up securing a role as a customer service advisor at a call centre for Addison Lee – a private hire cab and courier company.

    Maurice joked: ‘One of the upsides is during the winter I’ll be kept warm by their heating bill and not mine.’

    Addison Lee’s head of customer support Sanj Gherra said it was a ‘no brainer’ to hire Maurice because he has ‘extensive experience’.

    ‘It is all about inclusiveness and diversity,’ Sanj said.

    Maurice was impressed the company did not ask him about his age at any stage of the hiring process.

    The pensioner said he was also looking forward to meeting colleagues and socialising with new people again.

    He encouraged any other retirees who are worried about money to consider finding a job as well.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X