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If we can't figure out the Irish border, what happens if Scotland join the EU?

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    #51
    Originally posted by hobnob View Post

    Are there any residential streets which cross the border?
    I was sure there are in Wales and assumed it must be the same. Though often it's a street where one side is in each country IIRC; the road is the border.

    Sounds a nightmare although as has been said, the EU does have land borders in fact rather length ones although only with a handful of countries (largely Russia and Ukraine). But I don't know how many Finns commute to Russia for work or pop across for a vodka.
    Originally posted by MaryPoppins
    I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
    Originally posted by vetran
    Urine is quite nourishing

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      #52
      Originally posted by d000hg View Post
      If I live on a street which straddles the border can I still go to the pub?
      I'm not your wife, so I can't tell you not to go.
      {emotionless greeting}

      Three Word Slogan

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        #53
        Originally posted by hobnob View Post

        Are there any residential streets which cross the border?

        I found an interesting blog post about this topic:
        What might a land border between the United Kingdom and a separate Scotland look like? | The Nation said No Thanks! (wordpress.com)
        According to that, there are 25 public roads which cross the border. There are photos of 2 (with no houses); I don't know about the other 23.

        However, one of the comments talks about people who commute between Dumfries (Scotland) and Carlisle (England). Presumably those people would need work permits for the other country and they'd need to go through a passport checkpoint every day. If they work from home, that might raise other questions, similar to "Can I take my laptop to France for my UK client?"
        That was an interesting read, thanks!
        I did a stroll around Windsor on 2 Oct for Alzheimer's Society. You can chuck me a few quid here if you like: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/lmallen-1

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          #54
          Originally posted by d000hg View Post

          If I live on a street which straddles the border can I still go to the pub? We saw this a bit in lockdown when Wales/Scotland/England had differing rules.
          In NI, Ireland and many other countries land borders go through people's houses, gardens or farms e.g. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-56978344

          I guess if the border is through your house or garden you are entitled to dual nationality so can go to the pub.

          If it's down your street and on the wrong side - nope.

          Btw Lockdown was fecking weird when they were doing tiers. I could walk to an area in a lower tier. However because all the leisure places knew people could do this as that's where they got most of their customers from and where some of their staff lived loads of them simply closed.
          "You’re just a bad memory who doesn’t know when to go away" JR

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            #55
            Originally posted by SueEllen View Post

            In NI, Ireland and many other countries land borders go through people's houses, gardens or farms e.g. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-56978344

            I guess if the border is through your house or garden you are entitled to dual nationality so can go to the pub.

            If it's down your street and on the wrong side - nope.

            Btw Lockdown was fecking weird when they were doing tiers. I could walk to an area in a lower tier. However because all the leisure places knew people could do this as that's where they got most of their customers from and where some of their staff lived loads of them simply closed.
            Ireland, along with the UK, is a member of the Common Travel Area. British nationals travelling from the UK don’t need a passport to visit Ireland. However, Irish immigration officers will check the ID of all passengers arriving by air from the UK and may ask for proof of nationality, particularly if you were born outside the UK. You are therefore advised to take your British passport with you. Why would Scotland if it gains independence be any different?
            Old Greg - In search of acceptance since Mar 2007. Hoping each leap will be his last.

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              #56
              Originally posted by vetran View Post

              Hasn't it been overfished for years?

              Of course they may be done up like a kipper (see what I did there) by the EU, Scotland doesn't seem too happy about post Brexit.

              https://www.openseas.org.uk/news/bre...the-long-read/
              God yes. Dived off Dunbar a few years ago and all there was in that area was rocks, wrecks and angry fisherman who didn’t understand that it was them who’d killed the golden goose.
              "I can put any old tat in my sig, put quotes around it and attribute to someone of whom I've heard, to make it sound true."
              - Voltaire/Benjamin Franklin/Anne Frank...

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                #57
                Originally posted by cojak View Post

                God yes. Dived off Dunbar a few years ago and all there was in that area was rocks, wrecks and angry fisherman who didn’t understand that it was them who’d killed the golden goose.
                sadly it seems complex and until Brexit lots of countries were raiding the North Sea. Over fishing & discarding are mainly banned now.

                https://www.openseas.org.uk/news/are...e%20overfished.
                "If you didn't do anything that wasn't good for you it would be a very dull life. What are you gonna do? Everything that is pleasant in life is dangerous."

                I want to see the hand of history on his collar.

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                  #58
                  For starters it's not a given that the EU would accept Scotland, but if they were admitted it would mean a 'hard' border, because the EU would insist on it. They would have to adopt the Euro, so any arguments about what currency they might use are pointless. I suspect quite a few HMRC offices might have to relocate, there seem to be a disproportionate number of them in Scotland. Mine was supposed to move to Edinburgh when whichever Scottish one I was a 'client' of closed a few years ago, but I ended up in Newcastle, possibly temporarily, possibly not.
                  Obviously our military bases will be moving down south, I don't know if we're supposed to offer the SNP (aka the governing party for the foreseeable future) some of our nuclear submarines, but it's doubtful they'd want them anyway.
                  As for the break-up of the Union, I'm sort of not that bothered, and never really have been. If it happens, it happens. So long, and thanks for all the oil, and all that. I do have (or rather did have, she died the same day as Elvis in 1977) a Scottish grandmother, so I will be applying for a Scottish EU passport when the need arises. Opportunity knocks, and all that. And I'll be helping the Scottish economy, they might need all the help they can get.
                  His heart is in the right place - shame we can't say the same about his brain...

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                    #59
                    Originally posted by Zigenare View Post

                    Ireland, along with the UK, is a member of the Common Travel Area. British nationals travelling from the UK don’t need a passport to visit Ireland. However, Irish immigration officers will check the ID of all passengers arriving by air from the UK and may ask for proof of nationality, particularly if you were born outside the UK. You are therefore advised to take your British passport with you. Why would Scotland if it gains independence be any different?
                    The Scottish are special and the arrangements they would have with countries inside the EEA and what's left of the UK would be different.

                    ​​​There is no telling if Scotland would want to be part of the Common travel area.
                    "You’re just a bad memory who doesn’t know when to go away" JR

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                      #60
                      Originally posted by SueEllen View Post

                      The Scottish are special and the arrangements they would have with countries inside the EEA and what's left of the UK would be different.

                      ​​​There is no telling if Scotland would want to be part of the Common travel area.
                      So, passport control at the border and a big fence? Bring it on!
                      Old Greg - In search of acceptance since Mar 2007. Hoping each leap will be his last.

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