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£600-£650 a day

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    #31
    To be fair when we set up new sites I worked in the only room that was finished with the trades outside in the hallway. I set up plenty of call centres via extension leads and on boxes.

    The trades are just enjoying a return to proper pay packets now the cheap labour is gone.
    "If you didn't do anything that wasn't good for you it would be a very dull life. What are you gonna do? Everything that is pleasant in life is dangerous."

    I want to see the hand of history on his collar.

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      #32
      Originally posted by _V_ View Post

      That's fine, just don't go around thinking £650 per day is anything special these days compared to many manual trades.
      Yup. It's almost like IT isn't black art anymore.

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        #33
        According to HMRC £650 a day is no longer in the top 1% of taxpayers, although it will probably still be in the top 1% of the adult population.

        Assuming 230 days a year invoiced, to be in the top 1% of tax payers you need to make:

        Year 2000, £102,000 or £450 a day
        Year 2010, £149,000 or £650 a day
        Year 2020, £175,000 or £760 a day


        So you need to make £750+ a day, these days, to have any bragging rights
        Last edited by Fraidycat; 28 July 2021, 12:29.

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          #34
          The MILF next door just messaged me asking if I fancied popping round and filling up her hole.


          I said no though. I'm useless at DIY.
          "If you didn't do anything that wasn't good for you it would be a very dull life. What are you gonna do? Everything that is pleasant in life is dangerous."

          I want to see the hand of history on his collar.

          Comment


            #35
            Originally posted by GigiBronz View Post

            it's true but you can get hammered in the pub every night or inbetween gigs, or even during the gig. You still fit the boiler in the end and get the money. It's not as if contractors don't have to keep up with the technologies, spend time outside of work studying or have a few months in-between gigs. The worse is probably being a permi anyway... that is for sure.
            As do tradesmen, depending on the trade / industry, you will have SSSTS, PTS, CSCS, 1st aid, fire marshal, confined working, trade tickets, a fair number are doing C&G, Degrees, Accreditation, CPD etc..
            Growing old is mandatory
            Growing up is optional

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              #36
              If it wasn't for the parts crawling under floors and in lofts (I am arachnophobic) I think being a tradesman would be quite interesting. You need a pretty wide range of skills and knowledge especially for something like plumbing or electrical work and every job is different. Lots of problem solving. Doesn't sound a million miles away from software development to me.

              To be an expert at ANYTHING takes a lot of time whether it's a foundation of book learning or just lots and lots and lots of practice.
              Originally posted by MaryPoppins
              I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
              Originally posted by vetran
              Urine is quite nourishing

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                #37
                And there's a big difference between the bloke (or lady) who does a simple home extension or new garden wall, and those on commercial sized projects who need all the industry certifications and experience.

                Like I say, IT skills ain't tulip these days when it comes to remuneration. Most scraping by on bench time and low paid contracts would do themselves a favour if they took their elitist heads out of their arses occasionally
                I design idiot proof software. Trouble is, they keep making better idiots.

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                  #38
                  Originally posted by _V_ View Post
                  And there's a big difference between the bloke (or lady) who does a simple home extension or new garden wall, and those on commercial sized projects who need all the industry certifications and experience.

                  Like I say, IT skills ain't tulip these days when it comes to remuneration. Most scraping by on bench time and low paid contracts would do themselves a favour if they took their elitist heads out of their arses occasionally
                  do you actually work in IT and understand what a good software engineer has to do?

                  to some extent I agree that there are a lot of crap people in the field, mostly people graduating sub-par universities that got the degree because the university wanted money. Then they realised that they can survive by playing the politics and having a very soft tongue. I've seen a few CS degrees that had barely any math in them. no complex subjects only some 'projects' and feel good classes.
                  No wonder they are getting replaced by indians.

                  But you cannot argue that someone can just switch from IT to semi-qualified physical labour and should be happy with it. Presumably they've been quite analytical in the past and through the process of selection at GSCE Uni etc they ended up in that position. The understand and can learn complex systems. Driven by different things than the usual plumber.
                  Most of them if you put them to work 5h per day doing repetitive work, they will be drained. Their body is not used to it. They are not getting any satisfaction from it because what pushed them towards that career in life is not there.

                  Also to be able to survive as contractor/permi nowadays is knowing the right people, networking, having exposure. You could be very good technically while still be unemployed because you upset/threaten the 'old boys club' that you find at client co. It has very little to do with being driven and doing good work that is solid in terms of engineering. Or at least what I've seen in large size companies.

                  What employers look for is control so someone, even if less prepared, that is more controllable - can be pushed further is to be preferred towards someone that is more entrepreneurial. That is why you get a lot of indians and foreigners -> because they can be pushed further and employers know that.
                  The phrase 'they don't want to put a revolving door' when looking to hire a contractor means they are too crap to keep good people and want someone to be pushed around and work for low wage. You would struggle to get a permi job an ex contractor for sure. To conclude, to some extent it has very little to do with your capability.

                  So someone that is struggling to get a job, it might happen for different reasons. Market imbalance, employers selecting certain type of employees, bad presentation skills. It has nothing to do with being qualified, productive and driven and actually wanting to get things done.

                  Also 'A's Hire A's -- and B's Hire C's' that is very true as well.

                  In conclusion what you said most likely comes out of spite, you probably haven't worked in this field or do not understand the dynamics of the workforce in IT or white collar jobs.

                  Also a lot of jobs are 'bulltulip jobs' made up by gov through incentives in different industries to hire people because you need full employment and there is no place for them somewhere else. You do also need people to do tulipty jobs but pushing educated people to do them is quite rogue when there is a cohort of the uneducated ready to do them but now willing to.
                  Last edited by GigiBronz; 28 July 2021, 15:00.

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                    #39
                    Originally posted by Halo Jones View Post

                    As do tradesmen, depending on the trade / industry, you will have SSSTS, PTS, CSCS, 1st aid, fire marshal, confined working, trade tickets, a fair number are doing C&G, Degrees, Accreditation, CPD etc..
                    most of them are box ticking exercises to give the people in that field a sense of entitlement and filter out the 'foreigners'. in terms of ability or skills acquired through them, as with any other certification... not that much
                    being an expert in a field needs the right attitude and self study. very few certifications can get you to be better at that.
                    Last edited by GigiBronz; 28 July 2021, 15:01.

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                      #40
                      Originally posted by GigiBronz View Post
                      Blah
                      I know foreigners who have done very well in their construction/trade careers and have set up home here permanently.
                      "You’re just a bad memory who doesn’t know when to go away" JR

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