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[Merged]Brexit stuff

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  • Fronttoback
    replied
    Originally posted by scooterscot View Post
    I reckon the currency devaluation will do a lot more damage in the short-term than and raw deal would. Think about it, increasing inflation will reduce consumer demand and the majority of our imports after food is tat from China. Appetite to export to the UK will not carry the same weight as when we were part of the EU. It should be obvious. I'm sure we will get a deal but the question that'll come (years down the line when a deal does come and low exchange rates have damaged small businesses), was it worth it?
    Small business that imports stuff will suffer increased prices, that they might push on to the consumer causing inflation. If this causes enough pain, local businesses will spring up to supply the parts cheaper than the imported gear. People only import because it has been cheaper to do so. So all these little local businesses pop up manufacturing parts that used to be imported - and this is how the UK rebuilds it's manufacturing base.

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  • scooterscot
    replied
    Originally posted by vetran View Post
    You know Arnie won that one? Went home & made babies.

    great film by the way.
    Yeah I know. I play both sides to keep myself entertained.

    Want to watch the movie now. He was in Munich last week being a numpty.

    Leave a comment:


  • scooterscot
    replied
    Originally posted by sirja View Post
    Time will tell, but I've seen and heard nothing to change my view that the EU will play hardball.
    I reckon the currency devaluation will do a lot more damage in the short-term than and raw deal would. Think about it, increasing inflation will reduce consumer demand and the majority of our imports after food is tat from China. Appetite to export to the UK will not carry the same weight as when we were part of the EU. It should be obvious. I'm sure we will get a deal but the question that'll come (years down the line when a deal does come and low exchange rates have damaged small businesses), was it worth it?

    Leave a comment:


  • vetran
    replied
    Originally posted by scooterscot View Post
    Aye we all know what kind of deal the UK is going to get.

    You know Arnie won that one? Went home & made babies.

    great film by the way.

    Leave a comment:


  • scooterscot
    replied
    Originally posted by GB9 View Post
    I'm sure we will get a deal. You always forget the cost to the EU states. It may well be a fudge but doing a deal is the only sensible option (assumption that EU Commission will do sensible).
    Aye we all know what kind of deal the UK is going to get.

    Leave a comment:


  • DodgyAgent
    replied
    Brexit voter launches petition to make support for remaining in EU a crime | The Independent

    A Vote Leave campaigner is calling on parliament to make supporting EU membership a criminal offence under treason laws.

    The petition ‘Amend the Treason Felony Act to make supporting UK membership of the EU a crime’ has been launched by Christian Holliday, a Vote Leave co-ordinator for Guildford and a Conservative Councillor. Posted on the parliamentary petition website, it calls on Westminster to ensure: “the Treason Felony Act be amended to include the following offences.

    “To imagine, devise, promote or encourage others, to support UK becoming a member of the European Union. To conspire with foreign powers to make the UK or part of the UK become a member of the EU.”

    Mr Holliday explains: “It is becoming clear that many politicians and others are unwilling to accept the democratic decision of the British people to leave the EU. Brexit must not be put at risk in the years and decades ahead.”

    He adds that he wishes for the legislation to be enacted “the day the United Kingdom leaves the EU” and gives a deadline of 14 April 2017.


    Whilst this flies in the face of the democratic system that we Brexiteers are defending I would be quite happy to make an exception to rid us of some of the pond life remoaners on here

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  • GB9
    replied
    Originally posted by NotAllThere View Post
    You do know that plenty of Tory voters (such as myself) were also in favour of remain (42% according to this - hey even 4% of UKIPpers voted remain!)?

    Tory 42/58
    Lab 63/37
    Lib 70/30
    Ukip 4/96
    Green 75/25
    SNP 64/36

    You've probably read the gruaniad more often in the last month than I've read it in the last decade!

    I read the Times, the Register and Private Eye, so get your targets right.
    Well, you're correct in my Guardian reading. I've lost count of how many articles I've read. And the Indy. They seem to be the ones that throw up the most whinging though so always come through on the search. I tend to read them as always useful to know what's going on in the land of doom and gloom.

    Anyway, you haven't mentioned them so i'm assuming you are satisfied with the worst case and 15 year comments I made on the £66bn.

    The vote demographics are interesting. Lots of wealthy, middle class voters in the South wanting out. Not all poor thick northerners as some would have us believe.

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  • NotAllThere
    replied
    Originally posted by GB9 View Post
    ...this is from your mates at the Guardian....
    You do know that plenty of Tory voters (such as myself) were also in favour of remain (42% according to this - hey even 4% of UKIPpers voted remain!)?

    Tory 42/58
    Lab 63/37
    Lib 70/30
    Ukip 4/96
    Green 75/25
    SNP 64/36

    You've probably read the gruaniad more often in the last month than I've read it in the last decade!

    I read the Times, the Register and Private Eye, so get your targets right.

    Leave a comment:


  • GB9
    replied
    Originally posted by sirja View Post
    Time will tell, but I've seen and heard nothing to change my view that the EU will play hardball. Try and 'War Game' it from their perspective. Potential cost of doing a deal that benefits the UK: An incentive to other countries (Sweden, Denmark, Netherlands, maybe even France) to push for similar leading to potential break up of the union. Cost of not doing a deal, purely economic impacting approx 8% of their exports. It has been and remains my view that for the EU, the cost of doing a deal outweighs the cost of not doing one. They will be encouraged by what's happened so far with Sterling and will look to dig in next year to try and provoke further volatility on Sterling and UK bonds. I could be wrong, but for now that's how I see it playing out. I think too many in the UK are only looking at this from a 'Pound and Pence' angle and are down playing the EU's desire to maintain stability.
    I've said a few times that I think the EU commission's ideology may be more important than 10s of thousands of EU jobs. At the moment we are 10% cheaper than we were. The EU is 10% more expensive than it was. When 10% tariffs are added that makes us back to where we were and the EU imports to us unsustainable ad they are. Yes, we'll pay more for some bits and pieces but EU imports will fall dramatically as we look elsewhere. The EU workers lose out to the ideology.

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  • BlasterBates
    replied
    Originally posted by vetran View Post
    Unfortunately the attitude from the EU is making compromise difficult. They are desperate that Brexit doesn't start a landslide.

    Consider everything indeed.
    Negotiations always start out with apparent tough positions. If the EU was uncompromising Norway and Switzerland wouldn't be in the single market. The EU is very flexible indeed when you open your purse

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