• Visitors can check out the Forum FAQ by clicking this link. You have to register before you can post: click the REGISTER link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. View our Forum Privacy Policy.
  • FREE workshop: Preparing contractors for Autumn : Weds 29th Sep at 7.15pm. More details here.

Anyone carry an epipen?

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Anyone carry an epipen?

    I had a very drastic allergic reaction late on Saturday night, with no obvious trigger. Initially I was aware of feeling very very itchy in a few places, and thought "that's weird". A few minutes later that was dying back when I happened to notice in the mirror some funny lumps, and as I was watching noticed my chest felt slightly tight. I called my wife "you need to come here" and in the 20-30s that took, I was totally covered in classic 'nettle rash' and struggling to breath and stay conscious.
    We have an oximeter and it showed my O2 had fallen to high 80s. We happen to have strong antihistamines in the house so I took one and then we waited to see if it got worse and we needed to call 999. I was fairly with it and remember really not wanting to go to A&E the Saturday night after an England game It hovered like that for maybe 5 minutes then gradually but consistently eased over the next hour; hives disappeared, chest opened up - although two days later I still have some tightness and it was quite bad yesterday - and then I went to sleep, since bizarrely I didn't feel panicked only tired.

    Anyway ramble over, do we have any people here with experience of this sort of thing? I have no known allergies and have never had a reaction to anything, but the speed and severity seemed like something textbook from House or Casualty! Is this the sort of situation where one would use an epipen? I don't know if it was anaphylaxis since my throat didn't swell and I had no 'sense of impending doom' (a real medical symptom!)

    If nothing else, who has some good stories to tell?!
    Originally posted by MaryPoppins
    I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
    Originally posted by vetran
    Urine is quite nourishing

    #2
    Any idea what caused it d000000000000000gh?

    I'm not allergic to anything that I know of, apart from certain posters in CUK.
    bloggoth

    If everything isn't black and white, I say, 'Why the hell not?'
    John Wayne (My guru, not to be confused with my beloved prophet Jeremy Clarkson)

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by d000hg View Post
      ...noticed my chest felt slightly tight.
      ...struggling to breath and stay conscious.
      ...hovered like that for maybe 5 minutes...
      ...chest opened up...
      Yeah, you should probably get that looked at soon.


      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by xoggoth View Post
        Any idea what caused it d000000000000000gh?

        I'm not allergic to anything that I know of, apart from certain posters in CUK.
        That's the weird thing, I hadn't eaten for hours or done anything atypical at all. I had opened a beer after a bath but a brand I've drunk before, a pretty normal routine. The internet tells me you can have strong allergic reactions due to internal triggers as well as external which I am reading between the lines as "we don't know why it happens sometimes"
        Originally posted by MaryPoppins
        I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
        Originally posted by vetran
        Urine is quite nourishing

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by d000hg View Post
          I had a very drastic allergic reaction late on Saturday night, with no obvious trigger. Initially I was aware of feeling very very itchy in a few places, and thought "that's weird". A few minutes later that was dying back when I happened to notice in the mirror some funny lumps, and as I was watching noticed my chest felt slightly tight. I called my wife "you need to come here" and in the 20-30s that took, I was totally covered in classic 'nettle rash' and struggling to breath and stay conscious.
          We have an oximeter and it showed my O2 had fallen to high 80s. We happen to have strong antihistamines in the house so I took one and then we waited to see if it got worse and we needed to call 999. I was fairly with it and remember really not wanting to go to A&E the Saturday night after an England game It hovered like that for maybe 5 minutes then gradually but consistently eased over the next hour; hives disappeared, chest opened up - although two days later I still have some tightness and it was quite bad yesterday - and then I went to sleep, since bizarrely I didn't feel panicked only tired.

          Anyway ramble over, do we have any people here with experience of this sort of thing? I have no known allergies and have never had a reaction to anything, but the speed and severity seemed like something textbook from House or Casualty! Is this the sort of situation where one would use an epipen? I don't know if it was anaphylaxis since my throat didn't swell and I had no 'sense of impending doom' (a real medical symptom!)

          If nothing else, who has some good stories to tell?!
          You need to get checked, you were quite lucky, if it ever falls to 90 again -> A&E.

          NORMAL VALUES


          Oxygen saturation values of 95% to 100% are generally considered normal. Values under 90% could quickly lead to a serious deterioration in status, and values under 70% are life-threatening.29 Patients may deteriorate considerably before there is a dramatic change in oxygen saturation because, as discussed previously, the Pao2 may fall from 100 mm Hg to 60 or 70 mm Hg before the oxygen saturation drops to 90%. Signs of deterioration include low BP, increased respiratory rate, and increased pulse rate.137 Other signs of altered oxygen saturation that would indicate checking Spo2 are altered respiratory rate; depth or rhythm; unusual breath sounds; cyanotic appearance of nail beds, lips, or mucous membranes; dusky skin; confusion; decreased level of consciousness; and dyspnea.1,29

          Oxygen Saturation - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics
          But I discovered nothing else but depraved, excessive superstition. Pliny the younger

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Gibbon View Post

            You need to get checked, you were quite lucky, if it ever falls to 90 again -> A&E.

            NORMAL VALUES


            Oxygen saturation values of 95% to 100% are generally considered normal. Values under 90% could quickly lead to a serious deterioration in status, and values under 70% are life-threatening.

            Oxygen Saturation - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics
            Thanks to Covid, we're pretty on the ball with SPO2 - my wife checks hers all the time - I think it was 89 so hence waiting to see which way it went with 999 on standby. But given I couldn't breath this seemed quite unsurprising. I think if it hadn't started to lift after only 5min I'd have been in an ambulance.



            Originally posted by MaryPoppins
            I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
            Originally posted by vetran
            Urine is quite nourishing

            Comment


              #7
              You should have got checked.
              With what you described you would have been fairly "fast tracked" through a&e and any wait would most likely be the wait on bloods.
              I have a pacemaker, I also have breathing issues and every so often the pacemaker has a "hissy fit" and this affects breathing which is an ambulance job. Even when A+E is full of p155ed up twats I get seen very quickly. The p155heads are an issue but with something like what you describe you should be prioritised ahead of these numpties.
              Former IPSE member
              My Website

              Comment


                #8
                I'm a beekeeper and don't carry an epipen myself , but a number of us in my association do.

                But what you've described doesn't sound like an allergy , the skin hives may be a strange side effect of something else.

                The rules are: If the swelling / reaction is near the original site of the sting (or entry point) - it's a localised reaction and probably ok, just keep an eye.

                Otherwise, we are told to look for 2 things mainly, neither of which are what you are reporting. People's O2 saturation might drop, but only because of swelling in the airways.

                The 2 things are - bad OR :
                1. Is there visible tracking or hives moving towards your heart from the localised site (i.e is it in your blood).
                2. Is there a reaction somewhere other than the site of the bite / entry point - this is the bad sign (systemic reaction) and is an indicator of anaphylactic shock etc.


                Now anyone reading this who is a clinician, will probably laff at my descriptions, but its not far off I reckon.

                So, I'd say - get to the docs and don't assume its an allergic reaction.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Once I drank beer from a can and I had itching all over, although not as severe reaction as OP
                  Later on I googled it and my guess was it was nitrates in beer that caused it.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I am not a doctor.

                    That's very frightening

                    My wife carries an Epipen. In fact she carries two like you're supposed to.

                    She was not allergic to anything until she reached her 50's then she started to develop allergies to weird things and sometimes she'd have a really bad reaction come on quickly like you described. Without an Epipen we found the best thing to do was for her to take both a ceterizine hydroxide and a loratadine immediately the symptoms started, sit down and try to stay calm. They usually went in around 30 minutes. She also developed late onset asthma - certainly the allergies play a part in this. Late onset is a "thing".

                    I've got used to it now - it happens a couple of times every month that she has a reaction but at first it was very scary. Since she got the Epipens we've not had to use them but the family have all been told how to administer them.

                    My wife went for allergy testing and found she definitely has an allergy to raw nuts and potentially lethally coconut, however all sort of things can set her off if they contain any sort of nut pollen. For example, certain types of wines can be an issue depending when the grapes were harvested. Because we never know when she's going to have a reaction it's very difficult for us to eat out and she has to keep her food simple when we do.

                    Hopefully what you experienced was just a one off - sometimes combined exposure to two different things at the same time can cause a reaction.

                    Allergy testing might help.





                    Last edited by Lockhouse; 7 July 2021, 08:26.
                    ...my quagmire of greed....my cesspit of laziness and unfairness....all I am doing is sticking two fingers up at nurses, doctors and other hard working employed professionals...

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X