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Contract Has "7 Day Trial" Clause - Should I be worried?

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    Contract Has "7 Day Trial" Clause - Should I be worried?

    Received a new contract for review today. 6 months, 1 week's notice either side but with a trial period of 7 days on the schedule.

    Not seen a contract ever with a trial period specified, and as this is a company I have not worked with before am a bit uneasy. This is via an agency - anyone had this in their contract before?

    #2
    Originally posted by Willy Win View Post
    Received a new contract for review today. 6 months, 1 week's notice either side but with a trial period of 7 days on the schedule.

    Not seen a contract ever with a trial period specified, and as this is a company I have not worked with before am a bit uneasy. This is via an agency - anyone had this in their contract before?
    In reality all contracts are instant dismissal (Sorry we have no more work for you). So I don't know what your concern is..
    merely at clientco for the entertainment

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      #3
      Originally posted by eek View Post

      In reality all contracts are instant dismissal (Sorry we have no more work for you). So I don't know what your concern is..
      This.

      If you aren't aware of what Eek is talking about then you have a clause in your contract that says you don't get paid unless you've got a signed timesheet. The client can ask you at 4pm not to come in tomorrow, or ever again. In that case you can't get a signed timesheet and won't get paid. Your notice period will continue as per the contract but you won't do any work and won't get paid so effectively instant dismissal.

      The only difference a 7 day period would have over normal is that they are likely to have a meeting to discuss do they continue in to the contract just before the time is up. If you've been crap it might force them to make a decision to let you go rather than just plod on with a crap contractor, which sadly I've seen many a time.
      'CUK forum personality of 2011 - Winner - Yes really!!!!

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        #4
        As above, with a 1 week notice period in the contract, you should view the whole contract as as a rolling 1 week trial. So, the 7 day trial period in the schedule is not really adding or removing anything.

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          #5
          I guess that my concern would be getting paid for the 7 days if they then decided to kick me out (maybe the work was only for 7 days in the first place).

          Yes, I am that cynical...
          "I can put any old tat in my sig, put quotes around it and attribute to someone of whom I've heard, to make it sound true."
          - Voltaire/Benjamin Franklin/Anne Frank...

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            #6
            Originally posted by cojak View Post
            I guess that my concern would be getting paid for the 7 days if they then decided to kick me out (maybe the work was only for 7 days in the first place).

            Yes, I am that cynical...
            Whether they could do that would depend on the wording in the contract.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Paralytic View Post

              Whether they could do that would depend on the wording in the contract.
              Not really. We've had plenty of cases of clients refusing to pay contractors for a couple of days work and then getting rid. If they don't sign the timesheet off then it gets very messy.
              'CUK forum personality of 2011 - Winner - Yes really!!!!

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                #8
                Originally posted by northernladuk View Post

                Not really. We've had plenty of cases of clients refusing to pay contractors for a couple of days work and then getting rid. If they don't sign the timesheet off then it gets very messy.
                Really. Legally, the client can't refuse payment unless the contract allows. Whether clients still try to not pay is a different matter, but comes in to play whether there is a trial period or not.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Paralytic View Post

                  Really. Legally, the client can't refuse payment unless the contract allows. Whether clients still try to not pay is a different matter, but comes in to play whether there is a trial period or not.
                  Yep but to give the OP the full picture there is the possibility if the client thinks they've not had value from it they have decided not to pay in some instances.
                  'CUK forum personality of 2011 - Winner - Yes really!!!!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Blessing in disguise!

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