• Visitors can check out the Forum FAQ by clicking this link. You have to register before you can post: click the REGISTER link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. View our Forum Privacy Policy.
  • FREE webinar: What does a post IR35 reform CV look like? : Wed, Jul 28, 2021 7:15 PM - 8:15 PM BST More details here.

Anyone who has 'went perm', how has it been?

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Anyone who has 'went perm', how has it been?

    I am 3 weeks in now. Because I'm WFH, I haven't had to get involved in any extracurricular nonsense but that's in the post. For some reason i feel more bullish, that I can state my views more forcefully now that I have the permie safety net, whereas with contracting getting paid invoices was the priority. I plan to make use of training that I would usually do in my own time.

    #2
    Originally posted by heyya99 View Post
    i feel more bullish, that I can state my views more forcefully now that I have the permie safety net
    I had a similar attitude when I did a short permie stint. It was fun at first, but by the end I realised it's a much easier life to carry on with a contractors mindset than slip into the soul destroying hell of permie bulltulip.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by krytonsheep View Post
      I had a similar attitude when I did a short permie stint. It was fun at first, but by the end I realised it's a much easier life to carry on with a contractors mindset than slip into the soul destroying hell of permie bulltulip.
      You can work how you want. That said, I'm working as a permie for a small consultancy, so there's very much a "we're a group of contractors" attitude anyway. Very light touch HR probably helps, along with working with at least one of the directors every day. As such, they've deemed appraisals largely irrelevant as they'd rather chat with us as the need arises (for good or bad!) than wait 8 weeks until we've both forgotten what it was all about. Not sure I'd be of the same opinion in a larger organisation, but the flip side is that there's opportunities to learn golf and climb the corporate ladder in a larger firm. Each to their own I would suggest.
      The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world that he didn't exist

      Comment


        #4
        In situations where you air your opinion and it doesn't quite follow the party or your manager's line then if your contracting you run the risk of no extension or worse case being asked to leave sooner rather than fulfill your contract

        For perm - you have this wonderful things called yearly appraisals.......normally your 'performance' leads to your bonus/annual payrise and depending on the size of the company links into future promotion prospects so you may quickly learn that it's death by a thousand cuts

        Comment


          #5
          I'd rather die in a ditch than go perm ever again.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by elsergiovolador View Post
            I'd rather die in a ditch than go perm ever again.
            Perfect timing, we are currently in an environment rich with ditches and plenty of opportunity for dramatic deaths.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by LondonManc View Post
              You can work how you want. That said, I'm working as a permie for a small consultancy, so there's very much a "we're a group of contractors" attitude anyway. Very light touch HR probably helps, along with working with at least one of the directors every day. As such, they've deemed appraisals largely irrelevant as they'd rather chat with us as the need arises (for good or bad!) than wait 8 weeks until we've both forgotten what it was all about. Not sure I'd be of the same opinion in a larger organisation, but the flip side is that there's opportunities to learn golf and climb the corporate ladder in a larger firm. Each to their own I would suggest.
              Similar situation to me. Enjoying the opportunities and the free training. Especially like the WFH perm element (with a bit of travel expensed). I've not regretted the move as yet.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Manic View Post
                Similar situation to me. Enjoying the opportunities and the free training. Especially like the WFH perm element (with a bit of travel expensed). I've not regretted the move as yet.
                Definitely. It was nice going down to London on a budget in excess of my contracting budget, fully-reclaimable. It was at our company's cost rather than the client, so the boss said that they can wait - if they're paying, you're going down first class and getting there for nine; if we're paying, you're going off peak standard class, but claim your bacon sandwich and coffee on the train! Nice not to have a 4:30 taxi ride to the station, that's for sure.
                The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world that he didn't exist

                Comment


                  #9
                  I'm 4 months into a perm role, at a place I wouldn't have considered before Autumn's dire job market. It is super-friendly and laid back, but the pace is incredibly slow.

                  The slow pace was annoying when in the office as I sit under manager's nose, so obliged to look 'busy'. As a wfh job it's fantastic though. In a more commercially orientated place, they would have worked out they didn't need to so many people. I feel really glad to be there under the circumstances.

                  I agree about finding it easier to speak out on anything that's not working. Boss is decent person.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Had a sinking, claustrophobic, feeling the moment I got the contract. Lasted ten months, left with nowhere to go.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X