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Moral Rights Waiver

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    Moral Rights Waiver

    I have been asked to Waive my Moral Rights for an IT Support role, has anyone been asked to do this before?
    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-righ...d-by-copyright

    Thanks

    #2
    That’s a bit unusual- are you expected to write training documentation or something?
    "I can put any old tat in my sig, put quotes around it and attribute to someone of whom I've heard, to make it sound true."
    - Voltaire/Benjamin Franklin/Anne Frank...

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      #3
      Originally posted by cojak View Post
      That’s a bit unusual- are you expected to write training documentation or something?
      Hasn't been specified in the job spec, even so, Im used to working on standard terms for just about every job ive had - that the contactor passes all works over to the client at the end of the contract.

      I get the impression its a bait and switch scenario, that I will be given a totally different role at some point.

      Decided I'm not signing it, so it may become a deal breaker.

      Comment


        #4
        From your link...

        Moral Rights


        Works often mean more than just the economic value they can generate from their exploitation they can be very special to the person who creates them as they have invested a lot in the work, emotionally and/or intellectually. As a result, copyright works need to be protected in ways that are different to traditional forms of property. Moral rights protect those non-economic interests.

        Moral rights are only available for literary, dramatic, musical and artistic works and film, as well as some performances.
        I can't think what that would cover for you so I'd sign and get on with it.
        'CUK forum personality of 2011 - Winner - Yes really!!!!

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          #5
          Based on NLUK's quote, I'd ask what the client / agency means by Moral Rights and just check what their understanding is. Maybe they've gotten confused and think it's to do with you waiving the right to object to tasks, or work with organisations, that offend your morals. You may scoff but never underestimate the stupidity of someone who's done a half day course in law.

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            #6
            It's quite normal to sign agreements which give copyright to the company you work for. In fact I can't remember a contract where I didn't sign one, so by refusing you will be restricting yourself. It may well be unusual for a support role though. I can't think of a disadvantage. The company just needs to make sure they own the rights to anything you produce whilst you're there.
            I'm alright Jack

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              #7
              Originally posted by BlasterBates View Post
              It's quite normal to sign agreements which give copyright to the company you work for. In fact I can't remember a contract where I didn't sign one, so by refusing you will be restricting yourself. It may well be unusual for a support role though. I can't think of a disadvantage. The company just needs to make sure they own the rights to anything you produce whilst you're there.
              Moral rights is a bit weird in this context, though. It's akin to copyright, but is used to additionally protect the name/reputation of a creator of some content, rather than merely the content itself.

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                #8
                Originally posted by northernladuk View Post
                From your link...



                I can't think what that would cover for you so I'd sign and get on with it.
                Probably this bit... I always put my name on documents I write as the author. The ownership is still with the client no matter what as they are paying for it. But I can't say I'd ever enforce anything if they removed my name.

                The right to attribution

                This is the right to be recognised as the author of a work. This right needs to be asserted before it applies. For example, in a contract with a publisher, an author may state that they assert their right to be identified as the author of their work.
                See You Next Tuesday

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