Anyone got Mesh Wifi at home?
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Posts 1 to 10 of 28
  1. #1

    My post count is Majestic

    d000hg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    My house
    Posts
    31,697
    Thanks (Given)
    126
    Thanks (Received)
    389
    Likes (Given)
    175
    Likes (Received)
    1338

    Default Anyone got Mesh Wifi at home?

    I asked about getting a better router a few months back to replace my HomeHub, and IIRC mesh wifi got scathing comments. Reading around today I'm seeing some really good reviews of products like Google Wifi and wondered if anyone has it and it relieves the nightmare of multiple access-points and devices that won't switch AP when they should?

    I'm trying to work out if my existing router gets subsumed into the mesh (some/most don't seem to have modems built in) or ends up just being used as a modem. Any reviews or knowledge welcome.

    I've read reviews of Google WiFi and the BT WholeHome so far. Niether apparently uses your router as a hotspot which seems a shame if you spent money on it.
    I'm wondering if you can combine them with powerline to extend your mesh to garage/etc over ethernet which would be neat... I just have a separate WiFi which is fine but "just works Wifi" would be lovely.

    Presumably these units are not compatible with other brands, or are they, since they follow some standard?
    Last edited by d000hg; 10th January 2018 at 19:03.
    Quote Originally Posted by MaryPoppins View Post
    I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
    Quote Originally Posted by vetran View Post
    Urine is quite nourishing

  2. #2

    Contractor Among Contractors

    Hobosapien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    LA - la la fantasy land
    Posts
    1,618
    Thanks (Given)
    67
    Thanks (Received)
    119
    Likes (Given)
    132
    Likes (Received)
    398

    Default

    I think Mesh is designed for providing coverage over several dead spots and is a bit pricey if you don't need that level of solution.

    Rather than start from scratch I've added homeplugs to extend the wired network from the ISP supplied hub/router, and added a wifi extender so I can get wifi at the opposite side of the house than the router that is next to the telephone master socket. My place isn't massive or built with thick walls so this simple solutions works for me.

    The wifi extender is a BT one that is pretty much plug and play, just give it the wifi access credentials and it repeats the signal. No separate wifi access point credentials to set up on the devices connecting to it. It has indicators for when the device is considered at optional placement (not too close to source or too far away, to ensure good signal being picked up). Cost about 30 notes if I remember right.

    There are many similar products and alternatives with tech reviews to decide whether they fit your needs and price pain point.
    Maybe tomorrow, I'll want to settle down. Until tomorrow, I'll just keep moving on.

  3. #3

    Godlike

    original PM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    9,691
    Thanks (Given)
    26
    Thanks (Received)
    388
    Likes (Given)
    96
    Likes (Received)
    1505

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobosapien View Post
    I think Mesh is designed for providing coverage over several dead spots and is a bit pricey if you don't need that level of solution.

    Rather than start from scratch I've added homeplugs to extend the wired network from the ISP supplied hub/router, and added a wifi extender so I can get wifi at the opposite side of the house than the router that is next to the telephone master socket. My place isn't massive or built with thick walls so this simple solutions works for me.

    The wifi extender is a BT one that is pretty much plug and play, just give it the wifi access credentials and it repeats the signal. No separate wifi access point credentials to set up on the devices connecting to it. It has indicators for when the device is considered at optional placement (not too close to source or too far away, to ensure good signal being picked up). Cost about 30 notes if I remember right.

    There are many similar products and alternatives with tech reviews to decide whether they fit your needs and price pain point.
    I thought about doing it this way - but do you not just end up with 2 (or more) different networks with the same name and password?

    The problem is that for whatever reason devices seem to want to cling to the network they were on even when it is nearly out of range and there is a much stronger one they can access.

    So having all the networks the same confuses the wife n kids as they say they are 'connected to wifi' but it is not working

    so I had to set up different ones and tell them which one to use based on where they were in the house...

  4. #4
    sal
    sal is offline

    Contractor Among Contractors


    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    1,455
    Thanks (Given)
    2
    Thanks (Received)
    58
    Likes (Given)
    350
    Likes (Received)
    285

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobosapien View Post
    I think Mesh is designed for providing coverage over several dead spots and is a bit pricey if you don't need that level of solution.
    It's much more than simply covering dead spots, you can do that with homeplugs and wifi extenders like you did.

    Here is some explanation on what it actually does with pictures:

    https://blog.amplifi.com/2016/09/15/...sh-technology/

    It's not that pricey and if it can save you the headache of constantly having to reset home plugs and wifi extenders - well worth it.

    Everything is wifi connected these days and it will only get more and more congested in the future. Investing in a strong and stable (see what I did there) WiFi infrastructure for your home is money well spent.

    Edit:

    Forgot to add to the main topic - I do have sorta mesh in terms that I only bought the AmplifiHD router reserving the option to add APs if and when needed. Turned out it can fully cover my flat (~1000ft2) on it's own and I never had to add APs to it
    Last edited by sal; 11th January 2018 at 08:50.

  5. #5

    Contractor Among Contractors

    b0redom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,187
    Thanks (Given)
    0
    Thanks (Received)
    29
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    104

    Default

    I had the same issue as OP. I have a 3 storey house (loft conversion) and a garden office, and I was trying to get a Draytek router and 2 draytek access points to work, and the experience was just rubbish. I replaced it with a 3 discs BT Wholehome Wifi setup and have excellent coverage all over the house and office now.

    The discs have a single LAN port, so you can use Ethernet to backhaul to your router if you want a bit more performance.

    I definitely would recommend them. The best thing for me is that I can wander around the whole house now without it dropping my SSH/Slack/Google Hangout sessions - I just automagically migrate from disc to disc. The config app is pretty basic, but does everything you'd probably need it to.

    Any questions fire away....
    And the lord said unto John; "come forth and receive eternal life." But John came fifth and won a toaster.

  6. #6

    Faqqed Off

    TheFaQQer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    36,493
    Thanks (Given)
    392
    Thanks (Received)
    1388
    Likes (Given)
    3828
    Likes (Received)
    3421

    Default

    Linksys Velop here. Had some issues with setup but once it was all done it does the trick.
    Best Forum Advisor 2014
    Work in the public sector? You can read my FAQ here
    Click here to get 15% off your first year's IPSE membership

  7. #7

    My post count is Majestic

    d000hg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    My house
    Posts
    31,697
    Thanks (Given)
    126
    Thanks (Received)
    389
    Likes (Given)
    175
    Likes (Received)
    1338

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobosapien View Post
    Rather than start from scratch I've added homeplugs to extend the wired network from the ISP supplied hub/router, and added a wifi extender so I can get wifi at the opposite side of the house than the router that is next to the telephone master socket. My place isn't massive or built with thick walls so this simple solutions works for me.
    I'm surprised you didn't get homeplugs with wireless AP built in - I have a couple of these (also have wired ports) and they're very useful for this way of doing things.

    Quote Originally Posted by original PM View Post
    I thought about doing it this way - but do you not just end up with 2 (or more) different networks with the same name and password?

    The problem is that for whatever reason devices seem to want to cling to the network they were on even when it is nearly out of range and there is a much stronger one they can access.
    This is the one drawback. Devices do NOT want to pick the best WiFi and even if they do switch you get a short transition, which can be annoying. I've seen Android apps to auto-switch since Android doesn't (I saw a blog saying Android supported it but it was commented out!) but haven't tried.
    My recommendation in this scenario is to NOT give every AP the same SSID, since you have to manually switch you might as well name them so people can figure the best one to pick.

    Quote Originally Posted by sal View Post
    It's much more than simply covering dead spots, you can do that with homeplugs and wifi extenders like you did.

    It's not that pricey and if it can save you the headache of constantly having to reset home plugs and wifi extenders - well worth it.
    It seems to me the ONLY thing you gain is seamless WiFi. And it IS that pricey. 100 minimum per hotspot for N hotspots plus a router/modem when a simple AP is 20-30 and you still get to use your router so you need N-1 extenders.
    I'm not sure if the mesh tech is that much more complex or it's just pricey 'cos it's new.

    Quote Originally Posted by b0redom View Post
    I had the same issue as OP. I have a 3 storey house (loft conversion) and a garden office, and I was trying to get a Draytek router and 2 draytek access points to work, and the experience was just rubbish. I replaced it with a 3 discs BT Wholehome Wifi setup and have excellent coverage all over the house and office now.

    The discs have a single LAN port, so you can use Ethernet to backhaul to your router if you want a bit more performance.

    I definitely would recommend them. The best thing for me is that I can wander around the whole house now without it dropping my SSH/Slack/Google Hangout sessions - I just automagically migrate from disc to disc. The config app is pretty basic, but does everything you'd probably need it to.

    Any questions fire away....
    Yeah I love the idea but can't see if I can justify the cost just for saving me 5s if I want to play chess on the bog which is covered by the extender

    I've seen at least one setup lets you chain devices with ethernet to cover bigger distances e.g. house<-->garden, I wonder if powerline/homeplug (are these the same?) can do this too.

    You said you're got 3 discs and presumably turned WiFi off on your original router, is that one per floor or what? How big is your house and how far away is the garden office? I'm a bit dubious the range of a single disc compared to a regular router... a decent router will cover most but not all my house.
    Quote Originally Posted by MaryPoppins View Post
    I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
    Quote Originally Posted by vetran View Post
    Urine is quite nourishing

  8. #8

    Super poster

    Lance's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    home
    Posts
    2,278
    Thanks (Given)
    22
    Thanks (Received)
    158
    Likes (Given)
    256
    Likes (Received)
    541

    Default

    from what I can tell 'mesh' is purely a marketing term for multiple access points, with the same SSID and linked together.

    In the old days you'd get multiple Cisco APs setup identically (except IP/hostname), all wired to the same VLAN and spread them round the building.
    Later Cisco APs, with 2 radios, could be used with one radio linked to the nearest other AP as a bridge, and the 2nd radio doing SSID. This 'mesh' appears to be the same as that.
    The device switching from one AP to another is not (or certainly wasn't) a function of the AP, rather it was the wireless NIC driver that determined.
    So for those trying to build this manually without expensive 'mesh enabled' devices try putting the APs closer so that the overlap is greater that way it should switch to the other AP while the weaker AP is still strong enough. Expect maybe 150-200ms dropout and TCP connections will carry on without dropping.
    See You Next Tuesday

  9. #9

    Faqqed Off

    TheFaQQer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    36,493
    Thanks (Given)
    392
    Thanks (Received)
    1388
    Likes (Given)
    3828
    Likes (Received)
    3421

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by d000hg View Post
    My recommendation in this scenario is to NOT give every AP the same SSID, since you have to manually switch you might as well name them so people can figure the best one to pick.
    If you have wireless devices like a printer you'll need to make sure you're on the same network before accessing it though, which can be an issue (particularly for children).
    Best Forum Advisor 2014
    Work in the public sector? You can read my FAQ here
    Click here to get 15% off your first year's IPSE membership

  10. #10

    My post count is Majestic

    northernladuk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    34,978
    Thanks (Given)
    147
    Thanks (Received)
    1596
    Likes (Given)
    1882
    Likes (Received)
    6449

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFaQQer View Post
    If you have wireless devices like a printer you'll need to make sure you're on the same network before accessing it though, which can be an issue (particularly for children).
    This is true but some of them, particularly newer printers have wifi direct so can connect to just that device.
    'CUK forum personality of 2011 - Winner - Yes really!!!!

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.