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Previously on "PIN analysis"

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  • d000hg
    replied
    Originally posted by SimonMac View Post
    All UK O2 mobile phone accounts come with the same default PIN, the number of people who change this are small.

    Journalists didn't "hack" peoples phones, they just exploited the lazy or technologically naive.
    Still hacking.

    Leave a comment:


  • eek
    replied
    Originally posted by SimonMac View Post
    All UK O2 mobile phone accounts come with the same default PIN, the number of people who change this are small.

    Journalists didn't "hack" peoples phones, they just exploited the lazy or technologically naive.
    The only "clever" trick was to use a second journalist to ensure the phone was engaged so that you hit the answerphone.

    Leave a comment:


  • SimonMac
    replied
    All UK O2 mobile phone accounts come with the same default PIN, the number of people who change this are small.

    Journalists didn't "hack" peoples phones, they just exploited the lazy or technologically naive.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheFaQQer
    replied
    If you want to see how popular yours is, the spreadsheet of PINs can be found here.

    Leave a comment:


  • d000hg
    replied
    I wonder how many nerds use 1234 in octal (2322).

    Leave a comment:


  • xoggoth
    replied
    8068 ? That's very close to the 8086 pin I always used to use for my business, based on the intel microprocessor.

    PS Thieves. The bank account is closed now but if you can nick Zeity's business card, I bet he uses the same one. Or 8080/6808/6800 etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheFaQQer
    replied
    Originally posted by Contreras View Post
    Nah, did it with a shell script. Python would have probably been quicker/easier - if I knew how.
    For some reason, I get magic = P6 which doesn't work.

    Oh well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Contreras
    replied
    Originally posted by Sysman View Post
    Out of idle curiosity how did you do that? Graphics tools or using some other data input?
    Nah, did it with a shell script. Python would have probably been quicker/easier - if I knew how.
    Code:
    #! /bin/bash
    
    set -e
    
    url="http://www.datagenetics.com/blog/september32012/grid.png"
    
    output_file="pins.csv"
    
    #wget "${url}" -O - | pngtopnm -plain | \
    wget "${url}" -O - | pngtopnm | pnmtoplainpnm | \
    (
        read magic
        read max_x max_y
        read max_c
    
        if [[ "${magic}" != "P3" || "${max_x}" != "700" || "${max_y}" != "700" || "${max_c}" != "255" ]]
        then
            echo "Oops!" >&2
            exit 1
        fi
    
        echo "PIN,Red,Green,Blue,Sum"
    
        x=0; y=$((max_y - 1))
    
        while read -a line
        do
            set -- "${line[@]}"
    
            while (( $# >= 3 ))
            do
                red=$1; green=$2; blue=$3; shift 3
    
                if (( ( (x % 7) == 3 ) && ( (y % 7) == 3 ) ))
                then
                    printf "'%02d%02d,%d,%d,%d,%d\n" $((x/7)) $((y/7)) "${red}" "${green}" "${blue}" $((red+green+blue))
                fi
    
                if (( ++x == max_x ))
                then
                    x=0; let y--
                fi
            done
    
        done | sort --field-separator=, --reverse --numeric-sort --key=4
    
    ) > "${output_file}"
    Code:
    ~/tmp$ head pins.csv
    PIN,Red,Green,Blue,Sum
    '1234,255,255,255,765
    '1111,255,255,223,733
    '0000,255,255,153,663
    '1212,255,255,126,636
    '7777,255,255,98,608
    '2000,255,255,86,596
    '1004,255,255,86,596
    '4444,255,255,77,587
    '2222,255,255,76,586
    
    ~/tmp$ tail pins.csv
    '9480,144,0,0,144
    '8957,144,0,0,144
    '6793,138,0,0,138
    '8398,132,0,0,132
    '0738,132,0,0,132
    '9629,125,0,0,125
    '7637,125,0,0,125
    '6835,125,0,0,125
    '8093,108,0,0,108
    '8068,0,0,0,0
    Still waiting for contract edits to be agreed...
    Last edited by Contreras; 15 March 2013, 20:38. Reason: code cleanup for TF, i just knew someone would try and break it :p

    Leave a comment:


  • jamesbrown
    replied
    Originally posted by Cliphead View Post
    So I need to change all my card PIN's from something other than 1111?
    Can you wait a few hours? It'll take a while to get to 55°51'N, 04°12'W.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cliphead
    replied
    So I need to change all my card PIN's from something other than 1111?

    Leave a comment:


  • jamesbrown
    replied
    Originally posted by Sysman View Post
    Out of idle curiosity how did you do that? Graphics tools or using some other data input?
    Interesting read.

    In terms of the plot,.... easily done in R, Matlab, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • d000hg
    replied
    Originally posted by Sysman View Post
    Seeing 8196 in that list made me think of a cross between 4096 and 8192. It might be interesting to run an analysis against the PINs known geeks use...
    Please don't!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sysman
    replied
    Originally posted by Contreras View Post
    I marked up the heat map he generated. The grid makes it easier to pick off certain values, like spotting your own PIN.

    Also managed to script something to extract the base results from that image into a csv file and hence to a spreadsheet. Hopefully I will be off the bench by next week so will have less time for this stuff!
    Out of idle curiosity how did you do that? Graphics tools or using some other data input?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sysman
    replied
    Originally posted by TheFaQQer View Post
    Cool - mine's 9997 on the list of popular numbers!

    Who'd have thought I could pick one so rare?
    From the article:

    Warning Now that we’ve learned that, historically, 8068 is (was?) the least commonly used password 4-digit PIN, please don’t go out and change yours to this! Hackers can read too! They will also be promoting 8068 up their attempt trees in order to catch people who read this (or similar) articles.
    Change yours before you attend any CUK bashes, 'cos the bad guys might attend too.

    Just sayin' like.

    Seeing 8196 in that list made me think of a cross between 4096 and 8192. It might be interesting to run an analysis against the PINs known geeks use...
    Last edited by Sysman; 14 March 2013, 14:41.

    Leave a comment:


  • northernladuk
    replied
    That is a great article. Should forward this to Nick for Monday links. Really interest read and good piece of work by the author.
    Nice find.

    Be interesting to know how many hits he has to that page from Romania

    Leave a comment:

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