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Previously on "Government review is on website"

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  • eek
    replied
    Originally posted by SouWester View Post
    What's a "shilling"? Is it a small shill?
    5pence or 12 old pennies.

    20 shillings to the pound.

    Inflation has impacted things over the years.

    Leave a comment:


  • SouWester
    replied
    Originally posted by eek View Post
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen [pounds] nineteen [shillings] and six [pence], result happiness.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.
    What's a "shilling"? Is it a small shill?

    Leave a comment:


  • eek
    replied
    Originally posted by SouWester View Post
    Not disagreeing as you know your own mind, but many would take the opposite approach.

    Maybe it's just on my mind as I am likely going permie, and am feeling uneasy about it.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen [pounds] nineteen [shillings] and six [pence], result happiness.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

    If my income is dropping (and going permie might knock it by 40% or more) I wouldn't be borrowing money - I would be cutting expenditure to meet my the lifestyle my new income would afford me (and it wouldn't be a week in Barbados and a week in New York as last year featured).
    Last edited by eek; 28 February 2020, 13:13.

    Leave a comment:


  • SouWester
    replied
    Originally posted by eek View Post
    Bin contracting and I would be watching every penny and definitely not borrowing any.
    Not disagreeing as you know your own mind, but many would take the opposite approach.

    Maybe it's just on my mind as I am likely going permie, and am feeling uneasy about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • eek
    replied
    Originally posted by SouWester View Post
    ...everyone on a nice steady income so they can feel OK about spending more on credit, and so they can be made to feel they have something to lose. I will stop there...
    Um no - I'm happy to spend on credit when I know I have a lot of money about to appear round the corner - far less willing to do so when I'm working to a budget..

    Bin contracting and I would be watching every penny and definitely not borrowing any.

    Leave a comment:


  • SouWester
    replied
    Originally posted by BoredBloke View Post
    It wasn't a fear, it was their aspiration - everybody under PAYE - nice and easy for them to collect the tax, even if it knackers up the economy
    ...everyone on a nice steady income so they can feel OK about spending more on credit, and so they can be made to feel they have something to lose. I will stop there...

    Leave a comment:


  • BoredBloke
    replied
    Originally posted by Disguised Contractor View Post
    So, in effect, the HMRC long-standing fear of the "disguised employees" will, ironically, come true.
    It wasn't a fear, it was their aspiration - everybody under PAYE - nice and easy for them to collect the tax, even if it knackers up the economy

    Leave a comment:


  • Disguised Contractor
    replied
    Originally posted by mallisarealperson View Post
    I think it will affect more people than they realise.
    Contracting is only part of the problem.
    Agreed. It's the fact that this legislation now permits duality of consideration ("employment for tax purposes, freelance for engagement purposes") that this now pushes the balance too far in the other direction, and now encourages all companies of any size to cease hiring permanent employees, and to switch to a long-term freelance model.

    No Rights Employee

    (I know this website was meant to be satire, not an advertisement, but as the saying goes, be careful what you say in jest...!)

    Advertisements asking for this model are starting to pop up now all over Jobserve, only a trickle now, which I think will become a tsunami once IR35 is ratified on the 11th of March.

    So, in effect, the HMRC long-standing fear of the "disguised employees" will, ironically, come true.

    Leave a comment:


  • northernladuk
    replied
    Originally posted by WordIsBond View Post
    I want to be perfectly clear. What I said was that your statement was stupid, not that you personally are.
    But if looks like a duck and quacks like a duck.....

    Leave a comment:


  • simes
    replied
    Originally posted by WordIsBond View Post
    I want to be perfectly clear. What I said was that your statement was stupid, not that you personally are.

    If you consider that I was toO narrow, I'm glad to rectify the deficiency and apply it beyond your statement.
    Rest assured, I never considered the statement to apply to me. And even if it did, I firmly believe in the right to free speech.

    But to ignore the (attempt at) humour for now, in my case, every single one of my clients, past and present, have now refused to use PSCs.

    If I wanted to continue what I am doing, I would be PAYE and Inside. Since that is the case, and if I were to continue with same and similar clients, I would never have to consult the CEST oracle. True or False? If True, then for me it IS redundant.

    Happy to be corrected.

    Leave a comment:


  • mallisarealperson
    replied
    Fight has only just started.

    a few hundred thousand contractors
    I think it will affect more people than they realise.

    Contracting is only part of the problem.

    Issue is HMRC and how big it has become.

    Winners will be outsource companies like errr whats the name ... Oh yeah Infosys.

    Leave a comment:


  • WordIsBond
    replied
    Originally posted by simes View Post
    If still considered stupid, keep reading as I am sure I can surpass even That.
    I want to be perfectly clear. What I said was that your statement was stupid, not that you personally are.

    If you consider that I was to narrow, I'm glad to rectify the deficiency and apply it beyond your statement.

    Leave a comment:


  • ShandyDrinker
    replied
    Originally posted by mallisarealperson View Post
    I had to check the document, as I thought it had not downloaded all of it. 26 pages including 5 for the title/blank/contents.

    I bet the document detailing the subsidised food at Westminster is longer.

    Only thing I can take from the IR35 mess is that the largest majority Conservative Government since thatcher will loose the next election because of a policy devised by a non elected Labour politician.

    I have been a ltd company contractor for 15 years. And now find my sector completely empty. Looking at crap perm jobs.

    At least there will be no more long drives and staying away from home. Few months and we can all start picking fruit, now the low skilled workers are banned from the EU
    I think you are dreaming.

    The reality is that no-one gives a toss about a few hundred thousand contractors. They know it and contractors know it hence why they're pressing ahead with it.

    What will lose them the next election is if they get someone truly electable in opposition and they don't come up with any completely crackpot policy ideas. There is also the small matter of them delivering for the north, kind of ironic considering it was successive Thatcherite governments which shafted them.

    In the grand scheme of things we have to move on. This fight is over. The only thing that is left is giving the government a bloody nose from time to time via class actions against clients. Give how apathetic contractors have been in banding together to fight these changes, the prospect of class actions in the future is very slim indeed.
    Last edited by ShandyDrinker; 27 February 2020, 15:35.

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  • northernladuk
    replied
    Originally posted by simes View Post

    Preparing for the worst, is my mantra.
    Like we do when we see your name pop in a reply to a post

    Originally posted by simes View Post
    It was meant as a bit of a joke - of course, I probably should smothered the post with smilies and other assorted emojis.

    If still considered stupid, keep reading as I am sure I can surpass even That.
    He did say close to the most stupid.. There are still plenty out there that surpasses it already but we are sure you can.

    Leave a comment:


  • simes
    replied
    Originally posted by WordIsBond View Post
    This has to be close to the stupidest comment you've ever blessed our hearts with.
    It was meant as a bit of a joke - of course, I probably should smothered the post with smilies and other assorted emojis.

    If still considered stupid, keep reading as I am sure I can surpass even That.

    Leave a comment:

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