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Who the feck is paying for this?

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    #61
    Originally posted by Churchill
    £16k wouldn't pay for the laser giro.

    If she's British, then fine, by all means repatriate. But at least do something effective to stop it happening again!

    Btw, how do you feal about Shambo?
    Shamboo should be chopped up and sold to McDonalds!
    Keep it clean!!!

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      #62
      Originally posted by Maxamus
      Shamboo should be chopped up and sold to McDonalds!
      Not a good idea, the poor cow has TB.

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        #63
        Does born here mean a UK citizen? If so, a UK responsibility I suppose, but pretty damn stupid to make so many with utterly unnaceptable third world practices and attitudes UK citizens in the first place. Has anyone seen the figures for homicide of and violence against women in Bangladesh? Do a Google search. Horrendous!

        Why the hell have we spent the last 400 years evolving our society beyond this sort of thing, only to take it back again with massive unreregulated immigration from the third world? Does something as unnaceptable as treatment of women as objects become ok just because minorities do it?

        In so many areas, it is politically correct crap to pretend that "third world" means anything but uncivilised. It is time some stopped confusing the idea that all people are much the same given the same chances (which I fully agree with and I think the evidence supports) with the idea that all societies are much the same (which is utter idiocy requiring total blindness on the part of the believer).
        bloggoth

        If everything isn't black and white, I say, 'Why the hell not?'
        John Wayne (My guru, not to be confused with my beloved prophet Jeremy Clarkson)

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          #64
          I don't mind my taxes spent on preventing this.

          However I wonder if this is an effective use of resources?

          If they jailed & where possible deported all those responsible it might become less common.

          Forced marraiges are repulsive, child abuse worse. However if there is no retribution they will continue.

          Whether we should have gone to Bangaledesh and effectively kidnapped her is open to debate. A diplomatic solution, i.e. our ambassador explains to the Bangaledeshi ambassador that if the girl wasn't on the next plane home and the perpetrators imprisoned then any money repatriated to Bangaledesh would be seized as suspected funds for terrorists and the visa office would close.
          "If you didn't do anything that wasn't good for you it would be a very dull life. What are you gonna do? Everything that is pleasant in life is dangerous."

          I want to see the hand of history on his collar.

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            #65
            Well I don't mind if my taxes go towards that. A British girl who got kidnapped at age 6.
            Hope it wasn't too costly though. I doubt the SAS were having too many sleepless nights about that particular rescue.

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              #66
              I am kinda with Churchy on this one, only kinda.

              If the girl is British, and I suspect she is (dual nationality) then she is deserving of our support. However, I am not sure we have any right to remove her from her own country and culture just because we find it distasteful. Nor do I see why the UK tax payer should be liable for the costs of such an operation or the costs of her long term support in such a situation.
              If she isn't then we have no right interfering with another countries culture.

              Questions: Are arranged marriages illegal in Bangladesh? What age is sex legal there between man and wife?

              We have had many arguments on this board about changing cultures and many of you say that people have a right to live by their own, particularly in their own countries. Why is this case different?

              We are not armed with all the facts here gents we are arguing on supposition.
              I am not qualified to give the above advice!

              The original point and click interface by
              Smith and Wesson.

              Step back, have a think and adjust my own own attitude from time to time

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                #67
                Originally posted by xoggoth
                Does born here mean a UK citizen?
                I had to look this one up, as neither myself nor my wife are UK citizens but our son was born here.

                http://www.yourrights.org.uk/your-ri...ionality.shtml

                "The British Nationality Act 1981 came into force on 1 January 1983. It defines who is British by birth and how people may become British through naturalisation or registration.

                People who were born in the UK before 1983 were automatically British citizens by birth. The only exception to this was children whose parents were working here as diplomats at the time they were born.

                Anybody born here after 1 January 1983 is automatically British if at the time of the birth:

                One of their parents was a British citizen.
                One of their parents was allowed to stay here permanently.
                For children born outside of marriage, it remains the case that British nationality can only be passed through the mother. Parliament has passed a law that overturns this - the Nationality Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 allows nationality to be inherited from the father, but as of 2006 this provision is still not in force.

                Where neither parent is British at the time of the child’s birth, but they later become settled, they can then apply for their child to naturalise.

                If children are not able to inherit a nationality from either of their parents and are born stateless, and if they live in the UK for the first seven years of their life without gaining any nationality, their parents can apply for them to settle and then become British. The Nationality Immigration and Asylum act 2002 provides that stateless children can acquire nationality after five years of continual residence, but this provision is not yet in force."

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