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Cryptocurrency

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    Originally posted by ladymuck View Post
    Some spammer thinks I'm going to send them some tulipcoin to this address: 1nJCE7GPLEgKVtoDB2vNKxivw3U6ogMeS

    Is there really no way of tracking down the owner of that account? Or reporting it in some way?

    Well there's this, but that doesn't point me to the person behind the account (such a shame people have sent them money)
    https://bitcoinwhoswho.com/address/1...NKxivw3U6ogMeS
    You want to report every spam email you get asking for money?!
    Originally posted by MaryPoppins
    I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
    Originally posted by vetran
    Urine is quite nourishing

    Comment


      Originally posted by d000hg View Post

      You want to report every spam email you get asking for money?!
      I don't get that many so why the heck not?

      Comment


        Originally posted by ladymuck View Post

        I don't get that many so why the heck not?
        Most people save this sort of pointless thing to keep them entertained after retirement.
        Originally posted by MaryPoppins
        I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
        Originally posted by vetran
        Urine is quite nourishing

        Comment


          Originally posted by d000hg View Post

          Most people save this sort of pointless thing to keep them entertained after retirement.
          Getting some early practise in

          Comment


            Fortune magazine has gone full degen...

            https://fortune.com/longform/decentr...o-wall-street/

            Whatever...

            Comment


              Great News For Cryptocurrencies: Senate Budget Deal Hinges On Billions In Crypto Taxes


              And therein lies the rub, because now that the Senate has agreed to use bitcoin as a taxable piggybank to pay for billions in pork, it means that bitcoin isn't going anywhere, and it certainly won't be regulated out of existence which has long been one of the biggest existential risks facing the space.

              In other words, and this is the good news, nothing has actually changed when it comes to the tax treatment of bitcoin but what has changed is that by requiring the taxation of bitcoin as a core anchor of the bipartisan spending bill, we can now forget a worse case scenario that see regulators stomping away the nascent space. If anything, one can argue that in hopes of generating even more taxes in the future, Congress will not only facilitate transactions in cryptos, but will also make it easier for the broader public to generate profits, i.e. taxes.
              God Bless America
              Whatever...

              Comment


                They will tax it out of existenZ, this is how they got Al Capone

                Comment


                  “Industry groups including the Blockchain Association, Coin Center and the Association for Digital Asset Markets outlined their opposition to the requirements in statements on Thursday, taking particular note of provisions in the draft version that could lead to targeting of individual users”

                  https://www.politico.com/news/2021/0...ructure-501885

                  Industry groups

                  “Brokers would be required to report people’s so-called basis, or the price at which they bought cryptocurrencies, as well as their gross proceeds — which would make calculating their tax bills much easier. Studies have long shown that when people know someone else is independently reporting their income to the IRS, they are far less likely to skirt tax obligations.

                  Lawmakers also want toinclude anti-money laundering provisions sought by the Treasury Department that would require transactions worth more than $10,000 to be reported to the government.”

                  So any non-compliance (like inability to know who bought-sold tulipcoins) will be treated as money laundering, applies worldwide
                  Last edited by AtW; 31 July 2021, 13:27.

                  Comment


                    “Banks are widening their crackdown on digital currencies with Monzo banning payments to Gemini, the US cryptocurrency exchange founded by the billionaire Winklevoss twins.

                    Gemini, which is worth about $2bn (£1.4bn), has been blocked by the challenger bank since July 21.



                    This week, Nationwide joined banks in restricting card payments to Binance, an exchange based in the Cayman Islands that has faced censure by the FCA.

                    Banks including NatWest, Santander and Barclays have all halted payments to Binance in recent weeks. Starling Bank also briefly blacklisted all cryptocurrency transactions, before reversing the ban.”

                    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/technolo...rypto-trouble/

                    Who cares, it’s only “fiat”, people with tulipcoins don’t need it anyway

                    Comment


                      ""As cybercrime picks up -- and the haul of digital tokens along with it -- government crypto coffers are expected to swell even further. Interviews with current and former federal agents and prosecutors suggest the U.S. has no plans to step back from its side hustle as a crypto broker. The crypto seizure and sale operation is growing so fast that the government just enlisted the help of the private sector to manage the storage and sales of its hoard of crypto tokens.
                      [...]
                      Once a case is closed and the crypto has been exchanged for fiat currency, the feds then divvy the spoils. The proceeds of the sale are typically deposited into one of two funds: The Treasury Forfeiture Fund or the Department of Justice Assets Forfeiture Fund. "The underlying investigative agency determines which fund the money goes to," said [Sharon Cohen Levin, who worked on the first Silk Road prosecution and spent 20 years as chief of the money laundering and asset forfeiture unit in the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York]. Koopman said the crypto traced and seized by his team accounts for roughly 60% to 70% of the Treasury Forfeiture Fund, making it the largest individual contributor. "


                      https://yro.slashdot.org/story/21/08...is-fiscal-year

                      Secret Service is part of Treasury, and it's coming to get yer all dirty tulicoiners!

                      Comment

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