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Loss of EU citizenship referred to the ECJ

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    Loss of EU citizenship referred to the ECJ

    There have been a number of court cases, but this is the first that has been referred to the ECJ. It particularly concerns those who exercised their freedom of movement rights (i.e. moved to an EU country legally and registered, on the basis of work/study/retirement/dossing around but without sponging). The complainant in this case now has no right to vote anywhere.
    EU's top court asked to rule on Britons' EU citizenship

    #2
    It has always been the case that Brits didn't have a vote in national elections even before the UK left the EU. The best you can expect is a decision to allow Brits to take part in local elections as they could as EU citizens, though I don't see that happening. I don't see this will confer any rights to work or move freely within the EU.
    I'm alright Jack

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      #3
      Originally posted by BlasterBates View Post
      It has always been the case that Brits didn't have a vote in national elections even before the UK left the EU. The best you can expect is a decision to allow Brits to take part in local elections as they could as EU citizens, though I don't see that happening. I don't see this will confer any rights to work or move freely within the EU.
      I agree it's unlikely, but the ECJ ruling that Britain could unilaterally revoke Article 50 was also unlikely, a bombshell. There are crazier ideas than that those who have actually exercised their freedom of movement rights before Brexit should not have them stripped because of some populist BS.

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        #4
        Originally posted by BlasterBates View Post
        It has always been the case that Brits didn't have a vote in national elections even before the UK left the EU. The best you can expect is a decision to allow Brits to take part in local elections as they could as EU citizens, though I don't see that happening. I don't see this will confer any rights to work or move freely within the EU.
        But up to fifteen years out of the UK, they could vote in UK national elections.

        This ECJ thing is weird though. Last time I was allowed to vote was some referendum or something back in 2016. I've just applied for citizenship of the country in which I live. Easy.
        Down with racism. Long live miscegenation!

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by NotAllThere View Post
          But up to fifteen years out of the UK, they could vote in UK national elections.

          This ECJ thing is weird though. Last time I was allowed to vote was some referendum or something back in 2016. I've just applied for citizenship of the country in which I live. Easy.
          That's a decision by the UK government not the EU if Brits can't vote in the UK.
          I'm alright Jack

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by zerosum View Post
            There have been a number of court cases, but this is the first that has been referred to the ECJ. It particularly concerns those who exercised their freedom of movement rights (i.e. moved to an EU country legally and registered, on the basis of work/study/retirement/dossing around but without sponging). The complainant in this case now has no right to vote anywhere.
            EU's top court asked to rule on Britons' EU citizenship
            How can one be a citizen of something which isn't a country?
            I think we know what's coming, this case should be very interesting.
            His heart is in the right place - shame we can't say the same about his brain...

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Mordac View Post
              How can one be a citizen of something which isn't a country?
              How can a non-existent (has not even got passports for its citizens) country be part of the World Cup?

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Mordac View Post
                How can one be a citizen of something which isn't a country?
                Easy. In Switzerland, Swissies are citizens of their community first, from this they derive cantonal citizenship and from that they derive Swiss citizenship. In the same way, being a citizen of a country in the EU gives EU citizenship.
                Down with racism. Long live miscegenation!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Mordac View Post
                  How can one be a citizen of something which isn't a country?
                  I think we know what's coming, this case should be very interesting.
                  I don't think citizenship would be retained, necessarily. But look at the Withdrawal Agreement. This allows UK and EU citizens that have exercised their freedom of movement rights before the end of the transition period to retain those rights (for UK citizens, it has to be in one chosen EU state), providing they build towards permanent residency. But some rights were lost -- onward freedom of movement and the right to vote. It's not impossible that the ECJ could rule that the loss of these rights, having once been exercised, was disproportionate and I think that's what the case aims at.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Mordac View Post
                    How can one be a citizen of something which isn't a country?
                    Virginia Law

                    The Constitution of Virginia defines and limits the powers of state government and the basic rights of the citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Like all other state constitutions, it is supreme over Virginia's laws and acts of government, though it may be superseded by the United States Constitution and U.S. federal law. Updated annually after legislative session.
                    Brexit cretin dispatched.

                    NEXT!

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