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    Default What is the General View on Leaving A Contract Early With Notice?

    I am 2 months into a 6 month contract (renewed after having done 3 months). The rates ok but the work I have moved onto doing has not turned out to be what I was expecting, as well as being pulled into another 'project' that is tulip. I've never pulled out of a contract before but this time I want out and the contract is written with a one week's notice either side.

    How do you deal with explaining finishing a contract early when you are looking for new gigs? Have you just stated your last day as the date when the contract ends or given the original end date and told the truth? Is not seeing a contract through viewed in a bad light? I have no other contract lined up yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tractor Trace View Post
    I am 2 months into a 6 month contract (renewed after having done 3 months). The rates ok but the work I have moved onto doing has not turned out to be what I was expecting, as well as being pulled into another 'project' that is tulip. I've never pulled out of a contract before but this time I want out and the contract is written with a one week's notice either side.

    How do you deal with explaining finishing a contract early when you are looking for new gigs? Have you just stated your last day as the date when the contract ends or given the original end date and told the truth? Is not seeing a contract through viewed in a bad light? I have no other contract lined up yet.
    1 - No future agent/client has any right to see the details of a previous contract.
    2 - you presumably have an IR35 'friendly' contract therefore you just refuse to accept the new work offered.
    3 - termination clauses are there for a reason. You've finished the work you were contracted for and don;t want the new work, so walk (in fact you can walk instantly, serve termination and just don;t bill for the week).

    If your contract doesn't exclude MOO then forget everything I said.

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    TBH it sounds like you have done the work you were contracted to do. Being pulled on to other work is clear direction and control so your IR35 status is now questionable. That alone should be giving you reason to move on.

    In your situation giving notice isn't all that unreasonable. Dumping your client to jump to new gig's at 20 quid a day more constantly is highly mercenary and not really a good tactic in a service/supplir industry but there are plenty of people that would argue it.

    If you are not going to make a habit of it and have reasonable justification then there isn't really a problem. The client may not like it and the agent even less but if you stick the terms agreed in your contract then there shouldn't be any short or long term fall out.
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    That's what notice periods are for. It is your career and so you need to do what is best for you.

    Just make sure you leave on friendly terms i) in case there is a chance to go back in the future, and ii) the IT world can be quite a small world and what goes around can come around...
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    Surely it's better to get yourself out there and see if you can get something else first?

    We've moved into the quiet period contract-market wise, why shoot yourself in the foot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackeye View Post
    Surely it's better to get yourself out there and see if you can get something else first?

    We've moved into the quiet period contract-market wise, why shoot yourself in the foot.
    It is normally easier to secure a new role if you pitch yourself 'immediately available', regardless of screening checks and equipment set up that can take 2+ weeks for any new role anyhow. But that's how it works.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tractor Trace View Post
    How do you deal with explaining finishing a contract early when you are looking for new gigs?
    "The work was complete"

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    Personally it all depends on why you're leaving. I have finished early when, like you, the job was done and I've facilitated people working for me to do the same in the same circumstances. However I have had a couple of times when people wanted to go simply for a "better" job elsewhere and they have found themselves outside the building within a few minutes (especially when I had fought hard to get the renewal for one of them when the manijmint were looking to cut costs).

    It's all about professionalism and the situation on the ground. They're your client, so always best to negotiate first and go contractual afterwards.
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    You are not leaving early, you are terminating it with the agreed notice, the agent will cause a fuss but that is less of an issue, depending on your relationship with your Client it could be perfectly fine. If as you say the work you were originally brought in to do has dried up, often a Client may feel bad for letting you go early so find something else for you to do to keep you sweet, and could do with letting you go to save budget themselves.

    Have you spoken to the client yet?
    “Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones.”

    ― Marcus Aurelius

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    Depends ont he contract. I've done it a couple of times. First was when the work was nothing like the project described at interview.

    The second was just recently. Ive been there ages, the work got boring. No hard feelings.

    In both situations I have been/will be offered work in the future. Its all about how you do it, keep that relationship up

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