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PTP Internet bridge between buildings, checking I got it right

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    PTP Internet bridge between buildings, checking I got it right

    I asked a while back about how to get internet wirelessly to the log cabin we've built and now I think I understand better but I'd like to check before pulling the trigger on buying something.

    Basically we want to extend our internet to the cabin which is about 20m from the house, (just) line of sight. While we use mesh Wifi discs in the house, I would rather the cabin had its own dedicated sub-network.

    We have rudimentary Cat6 in the house so my thinking is:
    • Run underfloor CAT6 from our GB network switch 20m to the external wall closest the cabin (we can get under floor easily)
    • Buy what they call a PtP kit, and put an external unit outside the house, and on the outside of the cabin facing the house
    • Connect the PtP units through the walls using Cat6.
    • Inside the cabin, install a simple router/WAP and plug the PtP unit into this


    As I understand it, the PtP units will establish a private link/bridge, NOT a wireless access point, their job is ONLY to link the cabin's wired networking to my house's wired network? All these units seem to offer multiple modes like access points, bridges, etc - but I'm assuming they do ONE of those things at a time, e.g. it can't be acting as a garden access point at the same time as bridging to the cabin?

    I was looking at these sorts of thing:
    Outdoor, Two Pack WiFi Building Links / Outdoor WiFi PtP

    Given we can get direct line of sight between the two PtP units themselves, and we are in the country without other people's WiFi everywhere, and the distance is only 20m, and it doesn't need to be super-fast, I feel a pretty low-end setup should work.

    So my proposal is to buy a simple kit. Because I'd heard the brand recommended, I'm drawn to: 403

    One question I have is about power. They seem to commonly use PoE and some kits explicitly mention I need to buy injectors whereas others don't, which could affect the pricing quite a bit. To my knowledge, I don't have anything that provides PoE and I have no experience with this at all.

    I see they'll also pre-configure my kit for me. For a cost. Is that worthwhile or a joke for grannies?
    Last edited by d000hg; 6 February 2020, 17:00.
    Originally posted by MaryPoppins
    I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
    Originally posted by vetran
    Urine is quite nourishing

    #2
    Why not just run CAT6 to the cabin?
    Originally posted by Stevie Wonder Boy
    I can't see any way to do it can you please advise?

    I want my account deleted and all of my information removed, I want to invoke my right to be forgotten.

    Comment


      #3
      PoE can be a bit of a faff, and you need to check that all your components use the same or compatible PoE standards.

      Rather than injectors you could just use kit with PoE built in. On both sides you could use something like this: NETGEAR 5-Port Gigabit Ethernet PoE Network Switch (GS305P) - Hub with 4 x PoE @ 55W, Desktop, Sturdy Metal Fanless Housing: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories

      You might also be lucky and find kit where one side of the ptp link also has a second radio for normal wifi on the 'client' side of the cabin. I'm not sure these even exist... it'd be nice if they did.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by SimonMac View Post
        Why not just run CAT6 to the cabin?
        Why wasn't CAT6 cable run at the same time the cabin was built alongside the power cable.
        merely at clientco for the entertainment

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by eek View Post
          Why wasn't CAT6 cable run at the same time the cabin was built alongside the power cable.
          Originally posted by SimonMac View Post
          Why not just run CAT6 to the cabin?
          Without a time machine, not a helpful answer

          FWIW the cabin has a separate power supply and there is no link between the two buildings. And when I asked (here) about laying CAT6 people advised me not to, IIRC due to change in altitude or something. Either way I don't want to dig a trench just for that now - it would mean quite a bit of work and probably wouldn't be up to regs.

          Originally posted by amanwhoisquiet View Post
          PoE can be a bit of a faff, and you need to check that all your components use the same or compatible PoE standards.

          Rather than injectors you could just use kit with PoE built in. On both sides you could use something like this: NETGEAR 5-Port Gigabit Ethernet PoE Network Switch (GS305P) - Hub with 4 x PoE @ 55W, Desktop, Sturdy Metal Fanless Housing: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories

          You might also be lucky and find kit where one side of the ptp link also has a second radio for normal wifi on the 'client' side of the cabin. I'm not sure these even exist... it'd be nice if they did.
          If PoE injectors can be tricky due to compatibility, how does buying a PoE Switch help? Surely this is just pushing the compatibility issue into the Switch rather than a dedicated component?

          It does suggest not mixing PtP and PoE brands is smart though - a bit more digging suggests these are not much money at all. I did see a kit with these included but it was £hundreds, it must've been a higher spec.
          Last edited by d000hg; 22 January 2020, 16:50.
          Originally posted by MaryPoppins
          I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
          Originally posted by vetran
          Urine is quite nourishing

          Comment


            #6
            I know you don't want to lay a cable but just to say, I set up a system like this for someone's outside office. A weatherproof cat6 cable was laid and simply connected to a switch in the cabin/office. Also re-purposed an old BT Home Hub 3 to give the shed its own wap point (per this procedure: Reuse a spare BT Home Hub as a Wireless Access Point | Unix etc.).

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by unixman View Post
              I know you don't want to lay a cable but just to say, I set up a system like this for someone's outside office. A weatherproof cat6 cable was laid and simply connected to a switch in the cabin/office. Also re-purposed an old BT Home Hub 3 to give the shed its own wap point (per this procedure: Reuse a spare BT Home Hub as a Wireless Access Point | Unix etc.).
              Assuming I go wireless, repurposing an old router should work in just the same way though, right? The PtP box in the out-building will post a short ethernet cable through the wall which acts as if it IS a (slow) cable to the house as far as the cabin is concerned?
              Like most of us I have a box full of old routers and wireless modems and access points which I would love to see in use.
              Originally posted by MaryPoppins
              I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
              Originally posted by vetran
              Urine is quite nourishing

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by d000hg View Post
                If PoE injectors can be tricky due to compatibility, how does buying a PoE Switch help? Surely this is just pushing the compatibility issue into the Switch rather than a dedicated component?
                You'll still need an extra power source each side of the link for an injector, and if you want a wired connection option on the other side, a switch with inbuilt PoE makes sense. Netgear are common as muck so the PoE compatibility there is quite good, but you do just need to quickly scan over the tech specs of whatever you buy in case you get tricked by some standard the mfctr has decided to use.

                That being said, if you have a box of old routers and other stuff lying around, it's probably worth seeing if you can reuse some of it. You said you don't really care about speed so you might be able to drop some open firmware on two old APs, set them to bridge mode, and see how the 20m works. It won't be as good as PtP kit, but might work well enough for your needs.

                You could also just make a 6" deep slice the entire 20m run and poke some fibre into the slice and go wired. Chances of this being snagged are pretty slim, and so what if it does, just do it again. If you do that though, you'd need to swap out the PtP kit for something with fibre terminations on them - probably fairly cheap as well.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Time is money...
                  Originally posted by MaryPoppins
                  I'd still not breastfeed a nazi
                  Originally posted by vetran
                  Urine is quite nourishing

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by d000hg View Post
                    Time is money...
                    Preparation now saves time later. You should have had a trench built to provide power to the summer house and ensured suitable other cables were ran at the same time.
                    merely at clientco for the entertainment

                    Comment

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