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Previously on "CUK Book Club: Currently reading..."

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  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post
    Next: "The Americans" by Alistair Cooke being a collection of Letters from America from 1969 to 1979.
    Done. For want of anything else that appealed, the Henry Kuttner "Ahead of Time" sufficed for the two remaining stories.

    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post

    Followed by "Ahead of Time" by Henry Kuttner, being an anthology. Amusing enough in parts, though in essence it's Golden Age type SF.
    Took an unexpectedly long time to finish: then again it's Golden Age (1940s/50s) and not one of my favourite authors.

    Apparently Neil Gaiman has had the collected stories of the Hogbens published as one volume.

    I think I'll give it a miss.

    Next: TBD. "Bad Science" by Ben Goldacre: read it before, once it's finished it'll be off to Oxfam.
    Last edited by DoctorStrangelove; 4 November 2022, 14:55.

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  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    For want of anything to watch on the idiot lantern this was plucked from its position on a bookshelf:

    "Redbeard" by Michael (Mike) Resnick, being the tale of a post apocalyptic post nuclear war New England populated by assorted mutants and "Normans".

    Amusing enough.

    1969. An early epic of his. I read and enjoyed "The Dark Lady" about 20 years (or more, probly a lot more) ago, whilst "Ivory" sits on a shelf somewhere awaiting attention.

    An easy read compared with some of the crap I read.

    Which didn't take long to finish.

    Followed by "Ahead of Time" by Henry Kuttner, being an anthology. Amusing enough in parts, though in essence it's Golden Age type SF.
    Last edited by DoctorStrangelove; 9 October 2022, 22:19.

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  • Lost It
    replied
    Just started on my Terry Pratchett collection again..... Sadly missed genius.

    Leave a comment:


  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post

    Next: "Secret Britain: Unearthing our mysterious past" by Mary-Anne Ochota. Somewhat lighter in tone but heavier in weight than the Stonehenge tome.
    Done. What a lot of stones. And bones.

    Next: "The Americans" by Alistair Cooke being a collection of Letters from America from 1969 to 1979.

    Leave a comment:


  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post
    "Saucerful of Secrets: The Pink Floyd Odyssey" by Nicholas Schaeffner

    No idea when I bought it but it was written in 1991, published 1992.
    Done. Mildly inneresting in its way. Our Rog & Our Dave really didn't like each other much back then. .

    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post
    "A brief history of Stonehenge" by the recently late Aubrey Burl (1926 - 2020). Mostly Sais free I'd have thunk since they didn't start turning up until about 400 AD and it would appear that those who built it buggered off before the Celts turned up.
    Done. Took a while but got there in the end, though there're still a few pages of notes that I probably won't bother with.

    Another tome that'll be off to the Oxfam bookshop in due course.

    Next: "Secret Britain: Unearthing our mysterious past" by Mary-Anne Ochota. Somewhat lighter in tone but heavier in weight than the Stonehenge tome.

    From appearances it would seem to be a present of some description.
    Last edited by DoctorStrangelove; 18 September 2022, 14:13.

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  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post
    Next: "Code Breaker in the Far East" by Alan Stripp. Put out in a bit of a rush in 1989 when The Demented Margaret was still upset about Spy Catcher & wanted to stop anyone who had worked in the field from writing about it by changing the Official Secrets Act.
    Done. An odd sort of book, begins with the personal history of his conscription, selection, training, then delves into some description of the many different Japanese codes, followed by some discussion of the results of the work in terms of action etc.

    Next: finishing some of the others that are ongoing before finding sommat else.

    Leave a comment:


  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    "Saucerful of Secrets: The Pink Floyd Odyssey" by Nicholas Schaeffner

    No idea when I bought it but it was written in 1991, published 1992.

    This is the fourth book in the currently reading liist.

    Some of them are proving to be quite a sloooooow read.

    The Stonehenge book is amazingly successful at sending me to sleep, there being a limit to the innerest one is able to show in dolerite, rhyolite, and sarsens, Q and R stones, and Aubrey holes. .

    Oooooo, almost getting to the sarsens after a mere 100 200 or so pages. . The excitement is palpable.
    Last edited by DoctorStrangelove; 4 September 2022, 14:47.

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  • woohoo
    replied
    I know this is thread is for books but how about Audio books.

    I can recommend the following, pretty funny, great for walks or the gym.

    We are Legion (We are Bob) - appeals to the software developer side of me, but the narration makes this book entertaining.
    Carl's Doomsday Scenario - give it a chance the first 10 mins are like this is pathetic but turns into a fantastic listen.
    Project Hail Mary - similar style to we are legion, entertaining and funny.

    Leave a comment:


  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post
    Next: "The Donkeys" by that Alan Clark chap, celebrating the genius of Kitchener, French, and, of course, dear old Dougie "Butcher" Haig.


    Next: "Code Breaker in the Far East" by Alan Stripp. Put out in a bit of a rush in 1989 when The Demented Margaret was still upset about Spy Catcher & wanted to stop anyone who had worked in the field from writing about it by changing the Official Secrets Act.
    Last edited by DoctorStrangelove; 20 August 2022, 15:21.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dark Black
    replied
    Been reading quite a few biographies recently.

    Currently, "Blade Runners, Deer Hunters & Blowing the Bloody Doors Off ..." by Michael Deeley

    Makes for a good read about the life of the producer of a number of cult movies over the years.

    Amusing fact:

    The Black Daimler used to pick up Michael Caine's character from prison near the start of the film, where he picks up a flag from the glove box and exclaims "This car belongs to the Pakistani Ambassador!".... was actually the Pakistani Ambassador's car. It was regularly serviced by the garage that had been tasked with supplying many of the cars for the movie and was quietly lent to the film crew without the owner's knowledge. The line was written in to the film as a result.
    Last edited by Dark Black; 10 October 2022, 09:32.

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  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post
    "The illustrated history of Gadget Warfare: The Vietnam War" by F. Clifton Berry Jnr.* 82nd Airborne.

    All that materiel, all those crazy weapons, Puff the Magic Dragon, Agent Orange, Daisy Cutters, CBU-55 FAE.

    And they still lost to little men with AK47s and bicycles.

    If there's something to be grateful to Harold Wilson for, it's keeping us out of that mess.

    *That's the late F. Cliffton Berry Jnr.

    https://www.airforcemag.com/f-clifto...-jr-1931-2020/
    Done. I have no idea why it's taken 30 years to get a round tuit.

    Next: "The Donkeys" by that Alan Clark chap, celebrating the genius of Kitchener, French, and, of course, dear old Dougie "Butcher" Haig.

    Leave a comment:


  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    "The illustrated history of Gadget Warfare: The Vietnam War" by F. Clifton Berry Jnr.* 82nd Airborne.

    All that materiel, all those crazy weapons, Puff the Magic Dragon, Agent Orange, Daisy Cutters, CBU-55 FAE.

    And they still lost to little men with AK47s and bicycles.

    If there's something to be grateful to Harold Wilson for, it's keeping us out of that mess.

    *That's the late F. Cliffton Berry Jnr.

    https://www.airforcemag.com/f-clifto...-jr-1931-2020/
    Last edited by DoctorStrangelove; 9 August 2022, 12:51.

    Leave a comment:


  • eazy
    replied
    Just Bought : Istanbul: A Tale of Three Cities - Bettany Hughes
    Reread & recycled : Battle Circle - Piers Anthony (found it in the loft)

    Leave a comment:


  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post
    Next: "AD500" by Simon Young: a fictionalised journey through the dark age British Isles by a Byzantine "embassy".

    Can't say it's a brilliant read but it's a good deal easier going than the aforementnioned.
    Done. Amusing enough. One can see why the Sais were so loved.

    Next: TBD. There's so little choice. .

    A book extracted from a bookshelf upstairs:

    "A brief history of Stonehenge" by the recently late Aubrey Burl (1926 - 2020). Mostly Sais free I'd have thunk since they didn't start turning up until about 400 AD and it would appear that those who built it buggered off before the Celts turned up.

    Ancient Alien Researchers are of the opinion that the Aliens from the Pleiades abducted them.
    Last edited by DoctorStrangelove; 7 August 2022, 15:03.

    Leave a comment:


  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by DoctorStrangelove View Post
    A bit of a change: "Garry Halliday and the disappearing diamonds".

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Garry-Halli.../dp/B0000CKQWV

    You really have to be an to remember these epics.

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0162080...m_flmg_act_134

    as watched on a 12" 9" b&w Pye console TV back in the mysts of time of 1960.

    http://www.tvhistory.tv/1950-Pye-CV306.JPG
    Done. One had forgotten how dumb Bill Dodds was, played by the late Terrence Alexander rather before he became Jim Bergerac's father in law.

    Next: TBD.

    Leave a comment:

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