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    #21
    Seagate are fine but make sure you get the enterprise disks and not from China, the Thai fabs have much lower failure rates. I have never lost a disk in 30 years of trading.

    SSD is not reliable over time yet, iron still best for long-term storage.

    Synology and their ilk offer energy-efficient file storage and useful tooling. Mine is now 10 years old without a glitch.

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      #22
      Originally posted by Platypus View Post
      Personally, I'd avoid Seagate and WD HDD like the plague.

      HDS (now HGST) and Toshiba consistently come out top in these reports:
      Hard Drive Reliability in 2019: Failure Rates of 108,461 Drives

      I'm sure lots of people will be along to point out that HGST is now a subsidiary of WD.

      I had a crop of Seagate 6TB drives a few years ago, that all failed within 12 months.

      I have Hitachi drives in my NAS, which I bought after a lot of research. I'd love SSD but prices are still too high, £1000 for 4TB. I could buy all my movies and TV from Apple for less than the £4k cost of SSDs for my NAS
      HPE Support document - HPE Support Center
      See You Next Tuesday

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        #23
        And I believe that Intel SSD have build in self-destruct too :-/


        https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...g61x2fpnq0fi00

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          #24
          Another vote for Synology having taken the plunge and upgraded from my old Netgear Duo NAS earlier this year. (The Netgear ran fine for 8 years or so with Seagate HDDS btw)

          Not the original question but for interest, I looked at lots of NAS boxes before I upgraded, shortlisted to Synology and QNAP in the end. It was very close but eventually went for the former. I'm sure the QNAP would be perform excellently too.

          Been running WD Red drives in the new NAS, also ran a pair for a couple of years in the old Netgear box without issue.

          Concur what's been said about buying your drives from different vendors ideally over a spread of time to minimise the chance of getting all from the same batch.

          There's the argument of whether or not to spin down HDDs when not in use (not an issue with SSD obviously). I'm still undecided on this but currently leave them spinning given the Reds are spec'd for 24/7 running (as I understand it anyway)
          Do what thou wilt

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            #25
            Originally posted by Dark Black View Post
            Another vote for Synology
            I went with QNAP... and kinda wish I'd gone Synology. Fan on the QNAP can be noisy. Really it needs replacing, I think the bearing is going.


            Originally posted by Dark Black View Post
            There's the argument of whether or not to spin down HDDs when not in use
            Like you, I went with "always on always spinning", there was something at the back of my mind telling me (maybe from history) that spinning drives up and down all the time shortens their lives.

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              #26
              HP Microserver is a good choice for freenas, has hot swap and costs around £300 ans giver better performance than any NAS at this price range. If you are not keen on FreeBSD/*nix world, WIndows 10 PRO with REFS on the storage volumes works absolutely fine as well. You put a small SSD as boot drive for OS and then add 4 HDDs in REFS raid volume.

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                #27
                Both of my HP Microservers have developed different faults over the last couple of years. Tried swapping mobos, which is a bit of a faff with how it's all packed into a small form factor, but didn't manage to get one working so I presume it's the mobo causing the issue in both cases rather than say a dodgy PSU or ram.

                Maybe the newer generations are more robust but if they're still doing the cashback then maybe it is a case of you get what you pay for, or maybe I've just been unlucky and they are getting on a bit anyway.
                Maybe tomorrow, I'll want to settle down. Until tomorrow, I'll just keep moving on.

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                  #28
                  Originally posted by Hobosapien View Post
                  Both of my HP Microservers have developed different faults over the last couple of years. Tried swapping mobos, which is a bit of a faff with how it's all packed into a small form factor, but didn't manage to get one working so I presume it's the mobo causing the issue in both cases rather than say a dodgy PSU or ram.

                  Maybe the newer generations are more robust but if they're still doing the cashback then maybe it is a case of you get what you pay for, or maybe I've just been unlucky and they are getting on a bit anyway.
                  Cashback is what makes those little bags of tulipe worthwhile. At full price they're crap.
                  Who wants tin these days anyway? Embrace the cloud.
                  See You Next Tuesday

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                    #29
                    Originally posted by Lance View Post
                    Cashback is what makes those little bags of tulipe worthwhile. At full price they're crap.
                    Who wants tin these days anyway? Embrace the cloud.
                    Exactly I got 3 gen.8s, 2 of them are in operation the 3rd one is sitting in the box for spare parts. Got them for like £70 after cashback, which is the price of a decent case alone.

                    If you are semi-comfortable installing an OS, they are by far the best choice for NAS, considering that anything that comes even remotely close to their performance and capabilities from the likes of QNAP and Synology costs £500+

                    Sadly HP removed the iLO in Gen.10 and went for tulipy AMP SoC. Really looking forward to Gen.11 and some EPYC based SoC. 10/10 would upgrade. Until then the venerable gen.8 are going strong.

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                      #30
                      Originally posted by Lance View Post
                      Cashback is what makes those little bags of tulipe worthwhile. At full price they're crap.
                      Who wants tin these days anyway? Embrace the cloud.

                      Yup, seems sane to have at least one cloud backup (fully encrypted of course) alongside the bit-rotting rusty hard drive local storage.

                      Been looking into Backblaze B2 which appears cheaper than the other big providers. There are smaller providers that may be cheaper buy they're probably virtual clouds where they archive it on their home NAS with SSDs.

                      xkcd: The Cloud
                      Maybe tomorrow, I'll want to settle down. Until tomorrow, I'll just keep moving on.

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