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Previously on "Any RaspberryPi gurus?"

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  • DoctorStrangelove
    replied
    Gosh. This almost inspired me to buy some electronicky stuff off Amazon.

    However I had the good sense to fall asleep watching some crap on the Blaze channel instead.

    After all, said stuff would only have joined the boxes full of such delights in the front room, where they've sat unused for the last 3 years (or three decades for some of it).

    <hiatus>

    Subsequently having looked at the datasheet for the DHT22, falling asleep was a good idea.

    Made me quite nostalgic for the simplicities of the IIC interface.
    Last edited by DoctorStrangelove; 22 June 2022, 09:28.

    Leave a comment:


  • courtg9000
    replied
    Originally posted by Protagoras View Post
    The 'raw' DHT22 sensor seems to refer to the basic packaged sensor which has 4 pins, three of which are used. If you use this, you need a resistor to pull-up the voltage on the data wire.

    If you go with the option of a DHT22 sensor on a PCB, then you avoid the need to connect a resistor, and it's just a matter of connecting the three wires to the PI. You just need some jumper leads or get a sensor that comes with the leads, as suggested by hairymouse. If you're going to be experimenting with PIs etc and sensors, it would make sense to buy a bundle of jumper wires of various genders.

    RPIs get somewhat warm in use, so you don't want the temperature sensor to be too close. Also, you do need to get the connections right first time or you can damage the electronics.

    As well as the DHT22, I'd suggest looking at the BME280 (temperature, pressure & humidity) since these are quite cheap and there's lots of examples for using these.
    e.g. https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/...ther-station/2

    If you need more accurate temperature readings, look at the MCP9808. Again, this is available already PCB mounted so you can connect with jumper wires.

    I'd recommend buying sensors from a reputable supplier since I think there may be copies in circulation.

    Some PI models seem to be in short supply at the moment. I use Arduino / ESP32s mostly for this sort of stuff since these are cheaper than PIs, although I've not tried micropython on these.

    If your requirement extends to monitoring multiple rooms and central monitoring and control, then I'd suggest having a look at publishing the data to a message broker such as mosquito.
    If you've not come across it, node-red is a great low-code approach for the logic and UI layers.
    +1 for node-red!

    Leave a comment:


  • Protagoras
    replied
    The 'raw' DHT22 sensor seems to refer to the basic packaged sensor which has 4 pins, three of which are used. If you use this, you need a resistor to pull-up the voltage on the data wire.

    If you go with the option of a DHT22 sensor on a PCB, then you avoid the need to connect a resistor, and it's just a matter of connecting the three wires to the PI. You just need some jumper leads or get a sensor that comes with the leads, as suggested by hairymouse, which looks like a very good option. If you're going to be experimenting with PIs etc and sensors, it would make sense to buy a bundle of jumper wires of various genders.

    RPIs get somewhat warm in use, so you don't want the temperature sensor to be too close. Also, you do need to get the connections right first time or you can damage the electronics.

    As well as the DHT22, I'd suggest looking at the BME280 (temperature, pressure & humidity) if you want something a bit cheaper (although possibly slightly less accurate) and there's lots of examples for using these. e.g. https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/...ther-station/2

    If you need very accurate temperature readings, look at the MCP9808. Again, this is available already PCB mounted so you can connect with jumper wires.

    When you buy a sensor mounted on a PCB, these will sometimes be delivered with the PCB and the connector separately, so that you'd need to solder the connector to the PCB. You probably want to avoid these ones.

    I'd recommend buying sensors from a reputable supplier since I think there may be copies in circulation.

    Some PI models seem to be in short supply at the moment. I use Arduino / ESP32s mostly for this sort of stuff since these are cheaper than PIs, although I've not tried micropython on these.

    If your requirement extends to monitoring multiple rooms and central monitoring and control, then I'd suggest having a look at publishing the data to a message broker such as mosquito.
    If you've not come across it, node-red is a great low-code approach for the logic and UI layers.
    Last edited by Protagoras; 19 June 2022, 12:33.

    Leave a comment:


  • hairymouse
    replied
    I'm no guru, but what about this one? https://www.amazon.co.uk/Digital-Tem...34826763&psc=1 At most you would have to buy a different set of those leads that have a male end to stick in the holes on your PI, like this https://www.amazon.co.uk/Elegoo-120p...1EV70C78&psc=1

    I think the raspberry pi one would be well within the ability of someone very new to all this, but for additional fun a microbit has a built in temperature sensor, is cheap and easy to play with. Don't be put off by the drag and drop code, it will do python as well.

    https://microbit.org/projects/make-i...r-thermometer/
    Last edited by hairymouse; 18 June 2022, 18:27.

    Leave a comment:


  • courtg9000
    replied
    Hiya mate,
    Im a bit au fait with Raspberry Pi. I have 5 of em!
    I don't do soldering at all!
    Can I suggest trying The Pi Hut. Customer service is excellent. If they don't know or have the product they should be able to point in right direction. https://thepihut.com/

    Leave a comment:


  • SimonMac
    started a topic Any RaspberryPi gurus?

    Any RaspberryPi gurus?

    I’m pretty comfortable with most things software, but hardware is an area of uncertainty with me.

    I want to create a room temperature monitoring system and have found this link

    https://opensource.com/article/21/7/...ure-sensors-pi

    However it’s saying “raw sensor” or “sensor with PCB included”, can anyone explain the what I should be looking for on Amazon or similar sites to ensure I buy the right thing (with as little or no soldering required)

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