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5 months until brexit, UK only rolled over 16 out of 236 international treaties

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    5 months until brexit, UK only rolled over 16 out of 236 international treaties

    <EDIT 14 not 16 so 222 more to do </edit>

    Yes only 220 more to do, but no worries we still have 151 days left
    Subscribe to read | Financial Times

    The UK has managed to “roll over”only 14 of the 236 international treaties that the EU has signed with countries around the world, raising fresh concern of disruption if Britain crashes out the bloc without a deal.

    With just five months to go to Brexit, the UK is under mounting pressure to replicate agreements that the EU has with 168 countries, so that Britain can retain rights that it currently has with these nations as a result of being a member of the bloc.

    Last week, Whitehall officials were given data showing that only a fraction of the 236 treaties that the EU has with countries outside the bloc have been successfully copied by the UK into new mini-arrangements with the relevant nations.

    Britain needs to roll over about 40 free trade agreements that the EU has with countries including Canada, Japan, South Korea and Mexico.

    The 236 treaties also cover important agreements well beyond trade — relating to airlines’ take-off and landing rights at overseas airports, as well as industries such as financial services, fisheries and nuclear.

    If the UK finalises a withdrawal deal with the EU, including a transition period beyond March 2019, it should give Britain more time to roll over the treaties.

    However, the issue of what would happen if no deal is reached was discussed by heads of Whitehall departments on Wednesday last week.

    According to people briefed on the meeting, the discussion on international treaties was “sobering” as permanent secretaries confronted the reality that many efforts to replicate the treaties were still incomplete.

    The lack of progress in rolling over all 236 treaties is the latest indication of how the government is struggling with its no-deal planning. Downing Street said: “We are working closely with partners to replace the agreements in the event of no deal.”

    Last week, the National Audit Office, parliament’s spending watchdog, reported that 10 out of 12 projects required to guarantee a fully functioning UK border in the event of a no-deal Brexit were at risk of not being delivered on time.

    Chris Grayling, transport secretary, told the cabinet last week that Britain could be obliged to charter ships to guarantee the supply of food and medicines should the country crash out of the EU without a deal.


    The meeting involving heads of Whitehall departments also highlighted tensions between UK officials who are negotiating Brexit in Brussels and their counterparts in London who are supposed to be making contingency plans in case the talks with the EU on the withdrawal agreement end in failure.

    “There’s a sense of frustration from the officials out in Brussels that they are getting all of the political heat, while their colleagues back in London are dragging their feet,” said one person briefed on the meeting.

    Britain’s difficulties in getting the 236 treaties rolled over are likely to arise for a number of reasons, according to one legal expert.

    “Other countries may see Brexit as an opportunity to reopen these [treaties], to get more out of the UK, rather than just roll over the existing agreements,” said this person.

    “They may have their own time-consuming domestic ratification processes. Agreement on how these treaties apply to the UK may also depend on what the UK’s future relationship with the EU looks like.”

    #2
    “Other countries may see Brexit as an opportunity to reopen these [treaties], to get more out of the UK, rather than just roll over the existing agreements,”

    No shoot Sherlock

    And yet the Gammons constantly shout "OUT, OUT, OUT NOW" on forums and HYS across the internet. They really are thick
    I am what I drink, and I'm a bitter man

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Eirikur View Post
      <EDIT 14 not 16 so 222 more to do </edit>

      Yes only 220 more to do, but no worries we still have 151 days left
      Subscribe to read | Financial Times
      It's just possible that they were the only treaties that we want to stay a part of. You do understand the concept of "there were some treaties that we were forced into", don't you?
      His heart is in the right place - shame we can't say the same about his brain...

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Mordac View Post
        It's just possible that they were the only treaties that we want to stay a part of. You do understand the concept of "there were some treaties that we were forced into", don't you?
        No, as the UK could have blocked any treaty between the EU and third parties if they wanted so.
        So BS

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Mordac View Post
          It's just possible that they were the only treaties that we want to stay a part of. You do understand the concept of "there were some treaties that we were forced into", don't you?
          You bring a new level of wishful thinking to the table., confirming just how thick Brexiters really are.
          Hard Brexit now!
          #prayfornodeal

          Comment


            #6
            https://publications.parliament.uk/p...de/520/520.pdf

            The UK currently benefits from the terms of trade agreements, and other trade-relatedagreements, that the EU has with countries outside the Union. The Departmentfor International Trade (DIT) has set as its second priority “to see a transition of [eachof these] agreements to a UK agreement at the point that we leave the EU”. The exactnumber of EU trade agreements seems to be a matter of some uncertainty. There appearto be around 40 agreements with about 70 countries. Ten of the UK’s top 50 exportmarkets for goods in 2015 were covered by these agreements. The third-country (nonEU)parties to the agreements account for around 11% of UK trade; and the prospectiveparties to those agreements which are nearest completion or awaiting ratificationaccount for another 25% of UK trade. Unless action is taken, these trade agreementswill cease to apply to the UK, without exception, at the point of Brexit in March 2019.In consequence, barriers to trade will be imposed.

            The EU is also a party to a wide range of other trade-related agreements, covering areassuch as regulatory cooperation, aviation, customs procedures, the nuclear industry andagriculture. The number of these too is uncertain, but a suggested total figure for allEU trade-related agreements is 759 (with 168 countries). There is an urgent need forclarity over the number, type, scope, extent and importance of the EU’s trade-relatedagreements. The Government must reassure us that it has a firm grasp of preciselywhich agreements will cease to have effect in respect of the UK at the point of Brexit ifno action is taken, and what the consequences of that would be.
            Brexit is having a wee in the middle of the room at a house party because nobody is talking to you, and then complaining about the smell.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Mordac View Post
              It's just possible that they were the only treaties that we want to stay a part of. You do understand the concept of "there were some treaties that we were forced into", don't you?


              Are you deliberately showcasing Brexiteer cretinism? Is so, bravo Sir!

              Comment

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