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    It was the first of three speeches which he gave during the period of the Battle of France. This speech (and the two others, the "We shall fight on the beaches" speech of 4 June and the "This was their finest hour" speech of 18 June) were a great inspiration to the embattled United Kingdom as it entered what was probably the most dangerous period of the entire war.

    Churchill gave the brief speech after calling for a vote of confidence in his new broad coalition government. The speech had three goals: first, to introduce the new government Churchill was forming, and also its policies and aims; second, to give to the country (both the public, and the legislators) the message that a confident, forceful and decisive leader had taken over; and third, to begin to speak plainly and directly to the country about the true magnitude of the dangerous situation the country now found itself in (a manner of address that Neville Chamberlain had eschewed), and to start to rally his countrymen to what he knew would be a long and difficult struggle.

    Earlier in the day Churchill had stated to his new Cabinet "I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat." and he repeated that phrase to Parliament in this speech. The phrase "blood, sweat and tears" arose as a common misquotation from this speech.

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      The Never was so much owed by so many to so few speech was a speech made by Winston Churchill to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom on August 20, 1940, at the height of the Battle of Britain.

      It was given as the United Kingdom prepared for what all felt was a likely invasion by Germany. In it he tried to point out to his countrymen that although the last several months had been a series of monumental defeats for the Allies, their situation was now much better; his judgment in this was in fact correct, because shortly thereafter they won the Battle of Britain — the first defeat for the hitherto unstoppable Nazi juggernaut.

      This speech was a great inspiration to the embattled United Kingdom during what was probably the most dangerous phase of the entire war. Together with the three famous speeches which he gave during the period of the Battle of France (the "Blood, toil, tears, and sweat" speech of 13 May, the "We shall fight on the beaches" speech of 4 June, and the "This was their finest hour" speech of 18 June) they form his most stirring rhetoric.

      It is best remembered for his use of the phrase "the few" to describe the Allied aircrew of Royal Air Force (RAF), whose desperate struggle gained the victory; "The Few" has come to be their nickname. It is reported that he coined the longer phrase which contains it in the car on the way back from a visit to RAF Fighter Command headquarters, during which he had witnessed the staff dealing with a heavy attack, but this may be apocryphal.

      At the end, he introduced the first phase of the growing strategic alliance with the United States, and referred to the coming agreement for giving the U.S. bases on various British possessions:

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        The This was their finest hour speech was delivered by Sir Winston Churchill to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom on 18 June 1940. It was given shortly after he took over as Prime Minister of Britain on 10 May, in the first year of World War II.

        It was the third of three speeches which he gave during the period of the Battle of France. These speeches (the other two being the "Blood, toil, tears, and sweat" speech of 13 May, and the "We shall fight on the beaches" speech of 4 June) were a great inspiration to the embattled United Kingdom as it entered what was probably the most dangerous phase of the entire war.

        It was given as France continued to reel from the stunning and massive German breakthrough at Sedan, France; it was shortly to be overcome, and sued for peace a week later, on 22 June. In it he tried to give a confident overview of the military situation and rally his people for what he probably knew was going to be a tremendous struggle. The final sentence of the extract below, referring to the idea that the British Empire might last a thousand years, illustrates Churchill's extreme attachment and faith in the Empire — its gradual dissolution in the subsequent decades was a source of great distress for Churchill.

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          What General Weygand called the Battle of France is over. I expect that the Battle of Britain is about to begin. Upon this battle depends the survival of Christian civilisation. Upon it depends our own British life, and the long continuity of our institutions and our Empire. The whole fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned on us. Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this Island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands. But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, "This was their finest hour."

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            The banana fruit grow in hanging clusters, with up to 20 fruit to a tier (called a hand), and 3-20 tiers to a bunch. The total of the hanging clusters is known as a bunch, or commercially as a "banana stem", and can weigh from 30–50 kg. The fruit averages 125 g, of which approximately 75% is water and 25% dry matter content. Each individual fruit (known as a banana or 'finger') has a protective outer layer (a peel or skin) with a fleshy edible inner portion. Typically the fruit has numerous strings (called 'phloem bundles') which run between the skin and the edible portion of the banana, and which are commonly removed individually after the skin is removed. Bananas are a valuable source of Vitamin A, Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, and potassium.

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              BMW was founded by Karl Rapp originally as an engine manufacturer, Rapp Motor. Bayerische Motoren Werke GmbH was founded as a successor company to Rapp Motor on July 21, 1917. [1] The Milbertshofen district of Munich was chosen, apparently because it was close to the Gustav Otto Flugmaschinenfabrik site. The blue-and-white roundel BMW logo, which is still used (illustrated above right) alludes to the white and blue checkered flag of Bavaria. It is often said to symbolize a spinning white propeller on a blue-sky background, although this interpretation developed after the logo was already in use. [1]

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                time to get 'em ready for school...

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                  got to find some things to show and tell...

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                    and make sure they eat some breakfast.

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                      Originally posted by DS23
                      got to find some things to show and tell...

                      lol how I remeber Show and Tell.
                      SA says;
                      Well you looked so stylish I thought you batted for the other camp - thats like the ultimate compliment!

                      I couldn't imagine you ever having a hair out of place!

                      n5gooner is awarded +5 Xeno Geek Points.
                      (whatever these are)

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