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Antartic ice not melting at amazing speed

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    #11
    Originally posted by mudskipper View Post
    So it is, and an Arctic Monkeys-esque rhyme pattern too. Subtle.
    maybe it rimed then




    (\__/)
    (>'.'<)
    ("")("") Born to Drink. Forced to Work

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      #12
      Originally posted by EternalOptimist View Post
      maybe it rimed then




      Me, me, me...

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        #13
        Originally posted by pjclarke View Post
        EO - your premise is just wrong. the Antarctic is a landmass surrounded by ocean, the Arctic is an ocean surrounded by land. The Arctic is losing sea ice at an alarming rate, the Antarctic is losing land ice at an alarming rate. see for example Velicogna 2009

        The above is of course a crass simplification, but you started it.
        Just like it did in the 1950s.

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          #14
          Originally posted by Doggy Styles View Post
          Just like it did in the 1950s.
          Actually there are several ice shelves that have disappeared that had been there for quite a long time. I read an article in sciam about it the other day. So not really 'just like' at all.
          While you're waiting, read the free novel we sent you. It's a Spanish story about a guy named 'Manual.'

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            #15
            Originally posted by doodab View Post
            Actually there are several ice shelves that have disappeared that had been there for quite a long time. I read an article in sciam about it the other day. So not really 'just like' at all.
            The point was that a similar ice-melt also occurred in the 1950s, thus 'just like' today.

            Arguing about exactly which bits of ice is beside the point. For example, we had patches of open water at the north pole then. I don't know, have we gone that far this time?
            Last edited by Doggy Styles; 9 September 2012, 21:55.

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              #16
              Originally posted by Doggy Styles View Post
              The point was that a similar ice-melt also occurred in the 1950s, thus 'just like' today.

              Arguing about exactly which bits of ice is beside the point.
              Really? Which ice shelves completely disappeared in the 1950s? Cos the ones that I was reading about had been there for ~10,000 years.
              While you're waiting, read the free novel we sent you. It's a Spanish story about a guy named 'Manual.'

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                #17
                Glaciers and ice sheets have been advancing and receding for thousands of years. Here is a report of evidence of Alpine glaciers having been further back.


                Also investigations of researchers of the ETH Zurich on the apron of the Unteraargletschers in the upper Bernese country resulted in strongly varying temperatures in the Alps, into whose attendants the glaciers advanced at times and retreated at times. "Scientific and archaeological findings fit together outstandingly", says Suter. From climatic research, it is well-known that in Europe between the 3rd Millenium and 1750 BC, a mild climate prevailed. The average summer temperatures might have been at that time for 0.5 to two degrees than today.
                Archaeological Finds in Retreating Swiss Glacier « Climate Audit
                I'm alright Jack

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                  #18
                  ...and here is an interesting article

                  Antarctic ice is growing, not melting away | News.com.au
                  I'm alright Jack

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                    #19
                    Originally posted by doodab View Post
                    Really? Which ice shelves completely disappeared in the 1950s? Cos the ones that I was reading about had been there for ~10,000 years.
                    Did I say that? No.

                    Read again. I said that enough ice disappeared from the pole itself to leave areas of open water. At the pole itself.

                    The north pole is one of the coldest spots in the Arctic, so if it can happen there at any time, it can happen anywhere.
                    Last edited by Doggy Styles; 10 September 2012, 08:28.

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                      #20
                      Originally posted by Doggy Styles View Post
                      The north pole is one of the coldest spots in the Arctic, so if it can happen there at any time, it can happen anywhere.
                      That's rather a large and probably erroneous assumption, and the fact that there are patches of open water doesn't really tell us anything about the volume of ice, merely where it is(n't).
                      While you're waiting, read the free novel we sent you. It's a Spanish story about a guy named 'Manual.'

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