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    #21
    Originally posted by SueEllen View Post
    Grow your own - if you have a space for a hanging basket you can grow strawberries and tomatoes.
    You're confusing people. Getting your hands dirty is frowned upon by some on this board.

    Comment


      #22
      Originally posted by The_Equalizer View Post
      You're confusing people. Getting your hands dirty is frowned upon by some on this board.
      They'll get used to it soon enough.

      Comment


        #23
        Originally posted by original PM View Post
        And they are not even berries - did your font of all knowledge tell you that too?

        https://alumni.stanford.edu/get/page...ticle_id=63171


        What qualifies a fruit to be a berry?

        We're all familiar with common edible berries that we buy from Waitrose, such as strawberries and raspberries, but why are these called berries and grapes, for example, are not?

        A reasonable hypothesis is:

        To qualify as a berry the fruit must be rotund in its morphology and its dimensions must lie within certain parameters.

        This clears up our grape as it is not round and nobody can postulate that an apple is a berry as the magnitude of its dimensions exceeds certain bounds.

        This does, however, leave the awkward question of the raspberry/strawberry axis.

        In my mind they are incorrectly deemed to be berries. This is not unusual in the world of edible produce; indeed the strawberry isn't a true fruit as its seeds are not contained within the carpel. Furthermore , why is a tomato considered a vegetable when it us a fruit?

        Comment


          #24
          Originally posted by northernladyuk View Post
          They'll get used to it soon enough.
          It'll do them no harm.

          Comment


            #25
            Originally posted by Pip in a Poke View Post
            What qualifies a fruit to be a berry?

            We're all familiar with common edible berries that we buy from Waitrose, such as strawberries and raspberries, but why are these called berries and grapes, for example, are not?

            A reasonable hypothesis is:

            To qualify as a berry the fruit must be rotund in its morphology and its dimensions must lie within certain parameters.

            This clears up our grape as it is not round and nobody can postulate that an apple is a berry as the magnitude of its dimensions exceeds certain bounds.

            This does, however, leave the awkward question of the raspberry/strawberry axis.

            In my mind they are incorrectly deemed to be berries. This is not unusual in the world of edible produce; indeed the strawberry isn't a true fruit as its seeds are not contained within the carpel. Furthermore , why is a tomato considered a vegetable when it us a fruit?
            In everyday terms they are berries. In botanical terms they are not true berries.

            Comment


              #26
              Originally posted by The_Equalizer View Post
              You're confusing people. Getting your hands dirty is frowned upon by some on this board.
              Oooh 'ark at the horny-handed son of the soil.
              You really are the epitome of mediocrity.
              Hard Brexit now!
              #prayfornodeal

              Comment


                #27
                Originally posted by The_Equalizer View Post
                It'll do them no harm.
                Yes, a leaner meaner Britain!

                Comment


                  #28
                  Originally posted by sasguru View Post
                  Oooh 'ark at the horny-handed son of the soil.
                  You really are the epitome of mediocrity.
                  I'd love to know where you get this phrase from. Is it common slang in third rate public schools?

                  Comment


                    #29
                    Originally posted by Pip in a Poke View Post
                    What qualifies a fruit to be a berry?

                    We're all familiar with common edible berries that we buy from Waitrose, such as strawberries and raspberries, but why are these called berries and grapes, for example, are not?

                    A reasonable hypothesis is:

                    To qualify as a berry the fruit must be rotund in its morphology and its dimensions must lie within certain parameters.

                    This clears up our grape as it is not round and nobody can postulate that an apple is a berry as the magnitude of its dimensions exceeds certain bounds.

                    This does, however, leave the awkward question of the raspberry/strawberry axis.

                    In my mind they are incorrectly deemed to be berries. This is not unusual in the world of edible produce; indeed the strawberry isn't a true fruit as its seeds are not contained within the carpel. Furthermore , why is a tomato considered a vegetable when it us a fruit?
                    Well as Miles Kington said

                    "Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad."

                    Comment


                      #30
                      Originally posted by sasguru View Post
                      Oooh 'ark at the horny-handed son of the soil.
                      You really are the epitome of mediocrity.
                      You're being unfair. Our Brexiteer friends, having retreated from 'it will be a resounding success' to 'it is all the fault of the remonaners for talking the country down', are now entrenching in a 'we'll just have to make the best of it' position. Overall, that's fairly positive.

                      Comment

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