Contract to permie Salary Worth it ????
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  1. #51

    Nervous Newbie


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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewK View Post
    To do phd part time, takes around 5-8 years plus a lot of effort. Not many (if any) companies will pay for that with a good salary. However if you are "cheap" student, some would risk investing (plus from a good uni), but again that is for a very narrow field - machine learning. That is nothing to do with 90% of dev. Phd is not training. You will have to write papers, plus final work thesis ~50k words. I would encourage to do that only if you are young . But in that case it is better to spend your time and effort on some startup. There is no right way in life, but this one is "expensive".
    I'm thinking long term, with pension contributions maxing out at 1m gbp and punitive rates of taxation for high earners, doing something because it's interesting rather than lucrative becomes the deciding factor. Going contracting to avoid PAYE super-tax is also a hot topic at the moment and one that will be shut down completely in the next few years IMO. The OP is trying to decide between contracting and permdom; my point is to think about all the value-add things involved in a permie job and where he/she will be at age 55 considering the way this country is going financially, high earners paying 50%+ tax and no more tax efficient vehicles available to avoid this. I'm not saying formal training is the only factor but in a software-defined world being in a work environment that supports your learning and development is important too IMO. Additionally, your career aspirations may also be to become director/VP of a large multinational or product manager for some major software tool, only a permie job would offer this especially if you also need to do an MBA.

    Its not all about the $$$
    Last edited by DanielAnthony; 6th April 2017 at 10:47.

  2. #52

    Fingers like lightning

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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewK View Post
    You simply don't. MS certificates - nobody cares. Agile coach? To certificate that you can't do anything? In finance, accounting, you need certificates, in dev world nope. Plus everything changes too quickly and there are too many technologies. You contract is your certificate.
    Certification allows you to do training courses, which is another revenue stream. In case you ever need anyone to do any training

  3. #53

    TripleIronDad

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    There are few benefits to the permie job. And a big downside. An extra 2 hours a day. It would take a lot of money to compensate me for that.
    Katy Perry - don't be afraid to catch feels. Taylor Swift - feels $1 a go.

  4. #54

    Old Greg is my bitch's bitch

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrilloPad View Post
    There are few benefits to the permie job. And a big downside. An extra 2 hours a day. It would take a lot of money to compensate me for that.
    Mrs BP says that's an upside.
    Where there's muck there's brass.

  5. #55

    Still gathering requirements...


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    Quote Originally Posted by BrilloPad View Post
    There are few benefits to the permie job. And a big downside. An extra 2 hours a day. It would take a lot of money to compensate me for that.
    You are full of horse sh!t. The complexity of an "contractor vs permie" role is far more complex than stating

    - there are few benefits to permie job

    There is an array of considerations to both! It simply isn't that simple and the decision should not be taken lightly - and this is coming from someone who remained a contractor for 5 profitable years with high day rates, and I still chose a permie job after very careful consideration with various discussion friends & family.

    There is a huge number of benefits to both (that is - when you compare a high day rate to a senior role in a big bank etc, must be a fair comparison). If you compare a good day rate against a bad company where everyone hates working there, well, then it isn't a fair comparison.

    Please help the newbies here properly rather than making frivolous comments.

  6. #56

    Nervous Newbie


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    Two factors to bear in mind. Firstly, is the type of work you do more suitable for a contractor or a permie? And secondly, do you put money aside to cover for time on the bench?

    So,(bear with me on this), lets talk about doors. You fit one in a wall, it takes a short amount of time to do, but once finished it lasts for years and gives you a lot of use. You don't need a permie to fit a door, you need a skilled freelance tradesman who will do the job well, charge a rate that covers his time (plus a bit of profit) and then go.

    Now, if you told the carpenter you wanted him to be a permie on a much lower permie salary than his freelance rate, after fitting the door, there is nothing to do, but oil the hinges once a year. You dont want to pay a carpenters salary for someone who just oils a hinge once a year and you have someone less skilled and cheaper that can do that anyway. You don't need any more doors, so you make him redundant as soon as he has finished the door. You've earned a discount and the carpenter has been dumped with no money for his enforced break.

    So, If you think that the permanent job is a real permanent job, then maybe it's worth taking, but if you think the permanent job is a limited length contract in disguise, then maybe stay away or expect quick redundancy.

  7. #57

    Still gathering requirements...


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    My advice? Avoid any agencies who start their opening gambit with "I've got a solid six month contract fitting doors" unless you hear unattended to squeaking in the background.

    HTH.

  8. #58

    Should post faster


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    If you've managed to go from a 55k permie, to a 90k permie, while you've been working as an interim worker, it means you've picked up the skills to jump a career band without having to climb the 'career ladder', with all the associated BS.

    Whether you take the job really depends on your industry and skillset. There is a lot of generic rubbish thrown around here, that "contracting is doomed" and there are no longer any roles left. But in reality, if you certain skills that are in demand, there is plenty of work and longevity.

    If you think you can maintain in contracts for the next 5 years, stick with it because you will make more money. If you have any doubt, take the perm role because despite all the job cuts, it's more predictable.
    Last edited by blackeye; 10th August 2017 at 17:56.

  9. #59

    Fingers like lightning


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    Quote Originally Posted by LondonManc View Post
    I was more demonstrating that 236 is an unreasonable number to use for billing days if you're trying to compare with permanent days worked.
    Exactly - in the year since 1st September I've billed 205.5 days and expect to work another 11 days by the end of August. In the previous 12 months, I billed 220.5 days.

    However, I've been lucky that this has been my choice - none of those have been sick days. That level of time off for leisure purposes is entirely unthinkable in the permie world. Don't go contracting to go and work 236 days. Even permies 'only' do 232 days (52x5 = 260, less 28 mandatory days off).

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