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Dependency Injection - spaghetti atchitecture

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    #11
    Originally posted by Malcolm Buggeridge View Post
    Oh, Thankyou wery much Rachel. I shall give that a whirl in the morning. Incidentally, what's the menu command for this action?

    Edit: And thanks to those of you who recommended resparker. I'll download the trial tomorrow.
    You're welcome.



    And, FWIW, I'd give ReSharper a miss if I were you. As demonstrated, you don't need it to accomplish the task you actually asked about. More importantly, though, when you apply it to an existing project that hasn't utilised ReSharper during its development process, what you invariably find is that you get back a wall of 'error' messages, most of which are in fact merely opinions about things like naming conventions rather than actual problems.

    I'm not a fan of ReSharper even during development from scratch, but when applied to an existing project after the fact it can feel a bit like inviting that Harry Enfield character that continually says "you don't wanna do it like that!" over to tell you lots of things you didn't need or want to know that are 'wrong' with a solution that builds fine. This is particularly tiresome if you didn't even write the thing.

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      #12
      Originally posted by Malcolm Buggeridge View Post
      The project that I have the good fortune to have recently inherited is a right old can of worms.

      Now, I hear you say, the benefits of a loosely coupled architecture are boundless and, when properly done, conduce to an easily implemented testing framework.

      All well and good so far but, as a developer who has inherited a solution containing a gazillion factory classes, IoC container classes and interfaces I do have one small gripe.

      It's a complete mess. Whereas in the days of yore we'd complain of spaghetti code we now seem to have spaghetti architecture. Try looking for the class you're after that implements a particular interface (and herein lies my question). Visual Studio has no feature to allow one to find all classes that implement a particular interface in the same way as one can find all references to a particular type.Is there some kind of tool/add-on available for this purpose? I hope so because all this not being able to see the wood for the trees nonsense is likely to drive old Buggeridge doolally over the coming months.
      I don't know if it helps you but I had downloaded the Solution Navigator from the Extension Manager (VS2010) and I find it very useful. Basically it will list all the references, properties, methods of all the classes you have in the particular project/solution. Worth giving it a try me thinks

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        #13
        Originally posted by farout117 View Post
        I don't know if it helps you but I had downloaded the Solution Navigator from the Extension Manager (VS2010) and I find it very useful. Basically it will list all the references, properties, methods of all the classes you have in the particular project/solution. Worth giving it a try me thinks
        What, you mean the way Object Browser already does right out of the box:



        I'm never sure why people feel the need to plough into unnecessary complications like third party software and UML diagrams, when all the tools to achieve the result asked for are already there right out of the box within Visual Studio itself.

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          #14
          Try out resharper, if you put a little effort into it then you will find searching for classes, methods etc pretty fast and easy.

          The auto suggestions are pretty good and not intrusive in my opinion.

          I've found with resharper the more effort I put into it the more I get out of it. Though I respect that other people are more than happy to use vs out of the box.

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            #15
            Originally posted by Gentile View Post
            What, you mean the way Object Browser already does right out of the box:



            I'm never sure why people feel the need to plough into unnecessary complications like third party software and UML diagrams, when all the tools to achieve the result asked for are already there right out of the box within Visual Studio itself.
            Rachel what is not necessary for you may be necessary for me

            Basically the Object Browser cannot list the methods that you can find in the class, with the Solution Navigator you can. You can also search for a particular method, or parameter, in the search box and it will list all the occurrences.

            Full list of features here

            Announcing the Solution Navigator - The Visual Studio Blog - Site Home - MSDN Blogs

            I find it very useful

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              #16
              Originally posted by farout117 View Post
              Rachel what is not necessary for you may be necessary for me

              Basically the Object Browser cannot list the methods that you can find in the class, with the Solution Navigator you can. You can also search for a particular method, or parameter, in the search box and it will list all the occurrences.

              Full list of features here

              Announcing the Solution Navigator - The Visual Studio Blog - Site Home - MSDN Blogs

              I find it very useful
              Object Browser does list the methods in each class. The screen dump you quoted demonstrates it doing exactly that. And both Object Browser and the code view of Visual Studio can be used to find all occurrences of a given method being used; that was demonstrated in the previous screen-dump I provided - you just right-click and choose "Find All References" from the context menu that appears. It couldn't be easier.

              That's the thing I find with people that use add-ons to Visual Studio. They're always convinced that such tools enable the developer to do something that they couldn't otherwise do right out of the box, and they're always surprised when you point out there was a way to achieve what they're trying to do anyway that they just weren't aware of. What are you going to do if you need to contract somewhere that doesn't use your favourite gucci tools, and that for security reasons doesn't let you install your own software?

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                #17
                +10 Resharper.

                One of the few commercial add-ons I've ever purchased simply because it's so useful I do find it hard to live without now! Thank god current client uses it already.

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                  #18
                  Originally posted by Gentile View Post
                  Object Browser does list the methods in each class. The screen dump you quoted demonstrates it doing exactly that. And both Object Browser and the code view of Visual Studio can be used to find all occurrences of a given method being used; that was demonstrated in the previous screen-dump I provided - you just right-click and choose "Find All References" from the context menu that appears. It couldn't be easier.

                  That's the thing I find with people that use add-ons to Visual Studio. They're always convinced that such tools enable the developer to do something that they couldn't otherwise do right out of the box, and they're always surprised when you point out there was a way to achieve what they're trying to do anyway that they just weren't aware of. What are you going to do if you need to contract somewhere that doesn't use your favourite gucci tools, and that for security reasons doesn't let you install your own software?
                  Solution Navigator is an Add On that can be downloaded easily from Tools-> Extension Manager. I do not think I will ever find a client that will not allow downloading from the Extension Manager, however if I do, I will offer to bring in my own kit, and if they refuse, I will search for something else. Most probably if they do not allow the Extension Manager downloads, they will not even allow installing packages, which in my opinion is not acceptable. And I am sure you can convince the client that it will help in productivity.

                  I much prefer the Solution Navigator to the Object Browser, but as I said, its a matter of taste and opinions. I do not like the "primitive" look of VS, I like to add Add Ons that improve my productivity.

                  Re-Sharper is another one, its not free, but really worth the price of the licence. And I can tell you that it will improve your productivity a lot, at least from my experience, and I am sure lots of fellow contractors will agree.

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