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FTCs: the future of contracting?

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  • LondonManc
    replied
    Originally posted by elsergiovolador View Post
    That's how you can get yourself to Employment Tribunal. FTC has employment rights and someone doing the same job as FTC may raise a complaint about wage discrimination.
    These rights don't have to be the same as employees - a lot of rights don't kick in until after two years. At least this is a hard stop so they know they then have to offer you something different or bin you off.

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  • LondonManc
    replied
    Originally posted by edison View Post
    I've definitely seen more FTC roles come up in the last month or two. The HR department at my last client thought FTC was most likely the long term 'solution' to IR35 for them. Not sure about that but I saw one recently for a three year fixed term Head of IT which seemed ridiculous.
    Totally agree with them. Takes determination out of the equation and removes ambiguity of how you should be treated. If there's an assessment done of Outside = Outside, Inside = FTC then at least they've acknowledged it. The benefit for you is that you're not having to take the umbrella fees and risks into account.

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  • jayn200
    replied
    Originally posted by Whorty View Post
    I know this is an old thread resurrected, but I'd add that I've taken a couple of FTCs in the past; if the pay and benefits are right, good company for the CV and good experience/work then why not? In both cases my pay + benefits pre tax was not far off my ltd contract rates. Both 12 months in length. I enjoyed one more than the other but hey, who enjoys every contract they work on anyway?

    Not for everyone, but has worked fine for me
    I did one as well when I was quite junior. As long as net pay is where I need it to be and there is an end date.

    Problem is when you get to a mid career and higher the FTCs just don't come close anymore but maybe that will change. Maybe we will start seeing six figure FTCs, I just don't think they're very common.

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  • jamesbrown
    replied
    Originally posted by Whorty View Post
    I know this is an old thread resurrected, but I'd add that I've taken a couple of FTCs in the past; if the pay and benefits are right, good company for the CV and good experience/work then why not? In both cases my pay + benefits pre tax was not far off my ltd contract rates. Both 12 months in length. I enjoyed one more than the other but hey, who enjoys every contract they work on anyway?

    Not for everyone, but has worked fine for me
    Likewise, I had a couple of FTCs when I started out working for unis - pretty standard engagement for research staff. It's like any other type of job - if both parties are happy with the arrangement, no problem. It's when one party wants something different (e.g., to be a permie) that things don't work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Whorty
    replied
    I know this is an old thread resurrected, but I'd add that I've taken a couple of FTCs in the past; if the pay and benefits are right, good company for the CV and good experience/work then why not? In both cases my pay + benefits pre tax was not far off my ltd contract rates. Both 12 months in length. I enjoyed one more than the other but hey, who enjoys every contract they work on anyway?

    Not for everyone, but has worked fine for me

    Leave a comment:


  • elsergiovolador
    replied
    Originally posted by mjcp View Post
    Except that (under the new rules) the company has to take reasonable care... i.e. individual determinations. An agency FTC / Umbrella side steps that risk.

    M
    Yes you have to, but that is just a formality. If you have a contract written for a specific role, then you only do assessment for that role - there is no room for individual determination and this is permitted by HMRC. If you create a contract with the points I listed earlier, that is enough for it to be inside and meet reasonable care. It is much less risk than FTC / Umbrella.

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  • GhostofTarbera
    replied
    Originally posted by mjcp View Post
    Except that (under the new rules) the company has to take reasonable care... i.e. individual determinations. An agency FTC / Umbrella side steps that risk.

    M
    Indeed why would they take even a small risk


    Sent from my iPhone using Contractor UK Forum

    Leave a comment:


  • mjcp
    replied
    Originally posted by elsergiovolador View Post

    there is no penalty for declaring someone inside.
    Except that (under the new rules) the company has to take reasonable care... i.e. individual determinations. An agency FTC / Umbrella side steps that risk.

    M

    Leave a comment:


  • elsergiovolador
    replied
    Originally posted by mjcp View Post
    But your comparator is another person at the agency, not the end client, so they would be on the same terms or not doing the same job.

    M
    It may or may not be. I am only saying that "inside IR35" is the safest option, because company doesn't need to worry about employment rights or wrong status determination as there is no penalty for declaring someone inside.

    Leave a comment:


  • mjcp
    replied
    Originally posted by elsergiovolador View Post
    That's how you can get yourself to Employment Tribunal. FTC has employment rights and someone doing the same job as FTC may raise a complaint about wage discrimination.
    But your comparator is another person at the agency, not the end client, so they would be on the same terms or not doing the same job.

    M

    Leave a comment:

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