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isError = isError || false;

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  • NickFitz
    replied
    If you think JS and the browser DOM can be a pain now, just have a look at these JavaScript FAQs from 1996 - and that's when we only had one browser (Netscape Navigator 2) to worry about!

    Leave a comment:


  • minestrone
    replied
    I seem to always get dumped on javascript as has happened to me again. I don't even bother telling PMs that java and javascript are different now

    Anyway, I just can't get my head around the stuff. Just seems to be layers of hacks to do stuff that can usually be done quite simply server side.

    I agree that jquery/ajax stuff can be useful at times there just seems to be too much of it very badly written.

    Leave a comment:


  • VectraMan
    replied
    Yes, but really you'd want

    while(truthiness)
    {
    doUpdation();
    }

    // falsiness now applies

    Crazy language. I never thought initialising variables before you used them was much of a problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bunk
    replied
    Originally posted by mudskipper View Post
    if (truthiness)
    {
    doUpdation();
    }


    truthiness && doUpdation();

    Who needs readability?

    Leave a comment:


  • mudskipper
    replied
    if (truthiness)
    {
    doUpdation();
    }

    Leave a comment:


  • Bunk
    replied
    Originally posted by VectraMan View Post
    Does that not only work if isError is a boolean? I.e. the || operator is a boolean operator, it can only be true or false, and I'll take your word for it that undefined || false == false. But it wouldn't work if isError was 5.7.

    I would have done isError == undefined ? false : isError;

    Which says what it means, rather than some wierd script kiddyish hackery.
    In Javascript you have something called truthiness and falsieness. It means that non-boolean variables can be either truthy or falsy which means they evaluate to true or false when used in a boolean situation.

    eg. Off the top of my head, the following are falsy:

    false
    0
    null
    undefined
    empty string

    Everything else is truthy. So you could use:

    if(response) {
    do stuff
    }

    and assuming response is not a falsy value it should 'do stuff'.

    It's an odd language but it makes sense once you get used to it.

    Sort of

    Leave a comment:


  • VectraMan
    replied
    Originally posted by Bunk View Post
    It means - if isError exists then keep it the same, otherwise set it to false.
    Does that not only work if isError is a boolean? I.e. the || operator is a boolean operator, it can only be true or false, and I'll take your word for it that undefined || false == false. But it wouldn't work if isError was 5.7.

    I would have done isError == undefined ? false : isError;

    Which says what it means, rather than some wierd script kiddyish hackery.

    Leave a comment:


  • minestrone
    replied
    Ah, cheers, see it now.

    Christ, can they not just have types like normal languages.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bunk
    replied
    Originally posted by minestrone View Post
    Found the above in a line of javascript which I am not that great on.

    Is there any reason to do this? Am I missing something? Some js trick?

    Or can we just put this down to offshore devs?
    It means - if isError exists then keep it the same, otherwise set it to false.

    You see it a lot when you don't know if a variable or object has been created yet but you need it to exist so you might use:

    var CUK = CUK || {};

    So now you know that CUK definitely exists.
    Last edited by Bunk; 13 March 2013, 10:47.

    Leave a comment:


  • minestrone
    started a topic isError = isError || false;

    isError = isError || false;

    Found the above in a line of javascript which I am not that great on.

    Is there any reason to do this? Am I missing something? Some js trick?

    Or can we just put this down to offshore devs?

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