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  • The Lone Gunman
    replied
    Originally posted by BlasterBates
    ....not necessarily. For example a Ukrainian might apply for German citizenship due to having the right of abode in Germany because, for example, of German ancestory but with the express intention of going to live in France or Switzerland.

    It still doesnt matter, in his own mind he is not a settler in Germany.

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  • BlasterBates
    replied
    ....not necessarily. For example a Ukrainian might apply for German citizenship due to having the right of abode in Germany because, for example, of German ancestory but with the express intention of going to live in France or Switzerland.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Lone Gunman
    replied
    Originally posted by BlasterBates
    ...yes but what about those people that apply for citizenship get it and then move to another country...

    That is still moot. They would have been earnest in their request and commitment at the time.

    Now tell us the one about the shower of sh1t over cheshire!

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  • BlasterBates
    replied
    ...yes but what about those people that apply for citizenship get it and then move to another country...

    Leave a comment:


  • The Lone Gunman
    replied
    [QUOTE=BlasterBates]..well actually you'll find a lot of people (Brits) who have been there for 20 30 years and say the same thing. In fact they'll probably never leave, then there's an awful lot that don't know.

    So defining someone as a "Settler" requires Quantum Mechanics as there is only a possibility or probability that they might leave. So we don't know someone is a settler until he/she dies.

    ...and what do we classify a 90 year old that goes to Germany for the rest of his life and then dies on the plane./QUOTE]
    It is easy to see in some cases, asking for citizenship would be a strong indicator.
    That is all moot and diverts the argument. The individual in question knows what s/he is and acts appropriately. I bet the longer they stay there (where is here BTW) the more localised they get.

    Even as settlers I bet there have been very few cases of Brits demanding local law be changed to suit them. Unless they have become legal "citizens" there should be no consideration of changing the law for them.

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  • SupremeSpod
    replied
    Originally posted by BlasterBates
    ...and what do we classify a 90 year old that goes to Germany for the rest of his life and then dies on the plane.

    Dead Old Goat Choker!

    Leave a comment:


  • BlasterBates
    replied
    ..well actually you'll find a lot of people (Brits) who have been there for 20 30 years and say the same thing. In fact they'll probably never leave, then there's an awful lot that don't know.

    So defining someone as a "Settler" requires Quantum Mechanics as there is only a possibility or probability that they might leave. So we don't know someone is a settler until he/she dies.

    ...and what do we classify a 90 year old that goes to Germany for the rest of his life and then dies on the plane.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Lone Gunman
    replied
    Originally posted by BlasterBates
    ...huh

    What is the difference between "settling" and "living" abroad.
    I live and work in Germany, though I have no intention of staying here the rest of my life. Should I do so then I would say that I have settled here.

    Is that so difficult to understand?

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  • BlasterBates
    replied
    ...huh

    What is the difference between "settling" and "living" abroad.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lucifer Box
    replied
    Originally posted by BlasterBates
    But just as a by-the-by, there seems to programme after programme on buying houses, there's even a documentary about an Estate Agent



    I mean who the **** is interested in an Estate Agent...

    Do people actually watch that stuff in the UK ?????
    I draw your attention to today's BBC1 daytime schedule:

    09:15. To Buy Or Not To Buy. Dominic Littlewood and Melissa Porter come to the aid of an interior designer looking for a dream home with a healthy budget of £500k.
    10:00. Homes Under The Hammer. Up for auction: a tip of a four bedroom Edwardian villa in north London; a bit of a burnt out wreck in the Wirral; and a one bed house in Country Durham.
    11:00. Mind Your Own Business. Mrs S and Duncan Bannatyne reel in a fish and chip shop that's struggling to net new custom. Will their expertise turn a small fry enterprise into a tasty little turnover?
    11:30. Car Booty. The Rudge family try to raise as much cash as possible to give 78-year-old grandmother Teresa the new home she deserves.
    12:15. Bargain Hunt. Tim Wonnacott introduces two teams of mothers and daughters at Kedleston Fair. Which team will make a profit on their goods at auction? And which expert gave the best advice!
    14:05. Cash In The Attic. Pauline Robinson's home is so stacked with stuff she can hardly move. Persuaded by the prospect of a shiny new £1,000 fridge, she lets in the Cash in the Attic team.

    Anyone who says the BBC are flooding the schedules with home improvement shows clearly has no idea. There is a gap in the middle of the day for Neighbours and then at mid-afternoon for Diagnosis Murder.

    So saying, the one about running a chippy looks mildly interesting as it might make a nice post-contractor plan b.

    Leave a comment:

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