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  • cojak
    replied
    Originally posted by HoofHearted View Post

    I guess it's the nudge factor. As you can readily see how much you're using you're more inclined not to use it. I don't think they have any other special qualities - and as we know, there are several reasons to avoid them
    We never have the monitor on. A useless waste of energy if you ask me.

    Leave a comment:


  • quackhandle
    replied
    Fair enough. I still won't be getting one anytime soon.

    qh

    Leave a comment:


  • WTFH
    replied
    Originally posted by quackhandle View Post
    I did read that the older ones were a fire risk? And not very safe so could be hacked to get onto your home network.


    https://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/...-burglars.html



    qh


    You're quoting a Daily Mail article that is an advertorial for a couple of companies that do WiFi security.

    I've just checked our smart meter and it's definitely not connected to the home wifi. The created risk in the story is that if a hacker can access your home wifi and then if they could connect on to the smart meter and then if they read the current usage, they would be able to see that you aren't using much electricity, so you're maybe not at home.
    If a burglar wants to find out whether you're at home or not, there's easier ways than the number of leaps to conclusions made in the story. They could: ring your doorbell, or look to see if all the lights are out.
    That's easier than getting a load of wifi scanning equipment just to read your meter and take a guess from the reading.
    I mean, if the risk was really about reading an electrical meter to decide if someone is at home, then you could do the electric or gas meter that are frequently in easy-to-access places outside the house, and all you need is a triangular key.

    And then there's the "your smart meter data could be sold on the dark web"
    That's based on all the if statements above, and not even thinking about what information is actually on your smart meter.
    Here's what it holds:
    1. Your electric meter serial number.
    2. Your smart display serial number and software version.
    3. How much your electric costs.
    4. How much you are using

    It doesn't contain bank details, your address, your name, your newspaper preferences.

    It's a non-story created for luddites by a media outlet that relies on spreading fear, uncertainty and doubt.

    Leave a comment:


  • quackhandle
    replied
    I did read that the older ones were a fire risk? And not very safe so could be hacked to get onto your home network.


    https://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/...-burglars.html



    qh



    Leave a comment:


  • DealorNoDeal
    replied
    Have they ironed out most of the gremlins with smart meters now? I read reports of some problems with early models but don't know how prevalent this was.

    Our supplier EDF used to write to us regularly urging us to have one but they stopped since Covid.

    Leave a comment:


  • WTFH
    replied
    Originally posted by d000hg View Post

    Your meter doesn't make it easy to see when and how you're using energy. Most people don't run out to see how fast the wheel is spinning when they turn the TV on but a smart meter means you can from your armchair.

    It also means you are charged for precisely what you use rather than estimated readings. Many people forget to give monthly readings.
    It's useful as well for seeing how you're running to budget - I have our display set to show weekly spend. Seeing the kWh value isn't the same impact as seeing the £.

    As they say, knowledge is power, so it can be useful.

    Leave a comment:


  • DealorNoDeal
    replied
    Originally posted by d000hg View Post

    Your meter doesn't make it easy to see when and how you're using energy. Most people don't run out to see how fast the wheel is spinning when they turn the TV on but a smart meter means you can from your armchair.
    Yeah, I'm sure it's easier to identify where electricity can be saved with a smart meter but we still don't particularly fancy one. I bought a plug in Watt meter for a tenner off eBay which does a similar thing. I was surprised to discover that my 10-year old laptop uses over 3x the electricity of my wife's 2-year old one.

    Leave a comment:


  • d000hg
    replied
    Originally posted by ladymuck View Post
    I've never understood the claim that smart meters help you save money. Your meter ready shows you what you're using so other than a pretty graphic (I assume) what else does it offer?
    Your meter doesn't make it easy to see when and how you're using energy. Most people don't run out to see how fast the wheel is spinning when they turn the TV on but a smart meter means you can from your armchair.

    It also means you are charged for precisely what you use rather than estimated readings. Many people forget to give monthly readings.

    Leave a comment:


  • vetran
    replied
    Originally posted by dsc View Post

    Fairly sure that's not how grid load shedding works, as with this approach you'd be disconnecting people connected to various local stations rather than just off loading one specific one / one region etc.
    it isn't currently but I suspect that will change.

    The trick they missed was allowing the smart meters to receive flexible tariff information. Pop a TOS like connection on the front and build small receivers that allow you to switch off car charging / storage heating etc. and you would have a better control over load. I could select 3 hours of car charging and the Grid could decide when during the night and charge accordingly. They could switch on half the car charging etc. for the street then the other half.

    Leave a comment:


  • dsc
    replied
    Originally posted by _V_ View Post
    Remote disconnection. There is a risk that if there isn't enough generating capacity, those with smart meters might be temporarily cut off from the grid. They can't do this with dumb meters.
    Fairly sure that's not how grid load shedding works, as with this approach you'd be disconnecting people connected to various local stations rather than just off loading one specific one / one region etc.

    Leave a comment:

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