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100k perm + options its a Punt?

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  • ChimpMaster
    replied
    I had this option several years ago. Something like a 90k salary + bonus, stock, benefits etc and the best part was it would get me into new tech such as cloud.

    I didn't take the job - in fact I dropped out of the process at the 4th interview - but I always look back and wonder what might have been. Instead, I continued contracting in my very dated skillset and yes it's done me OK but I actually reckon I would have been better off if I'd taken the permie job. It would have lept me into new tech, I would enjoyed the benefits and upskilled for 2 or 3 years. I would have had far more choice in career/contracts than I do now.

    In fact, the shares themselves would have made me > $100,000.

    From my POV, if you feel that the permie job offers you a good step up, or a new skillset, and to a lesser extent even some good home comforts (WFH, less travel, good benefits etc) then it's worth a shot. Of course salary is important but I wouldn't focus on just that and certainly you'd never be able to compare it with a contract rate.

    Otherwise yes you might be secure in what you're contracting in now, but you don't want to look back and wonder what might have been.

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  • Lance
    replied
    100k perm + options its a Punt?

    Beware stock options. If you get actual shares then that’s fine, but options are often just jam tomorrow.
    I’d consider what you’ve been offered if you get the shareholding early on. If not then consider them of little value.
    Last edited by Lance; 2 November 2017, 09:44.

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  • VirtualMonkey
    replied
    Go for it. Nothing to lose as long as the money covers what you need...which it must or you wouldn't even be considering it

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  • SlipTheJab
    replied
    Originally posted by northernladyuk View Post
    I tried this a couple of years ago. Didn't work out, so handed in notice after three months and went back to contracting.
    Thats why the plan would be to keep the Ltd dormant for the next 6 months at least, doesn't cost a lot and then the option is always there to just pick up from where one left off.

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  • SlipTheJab
    replied
    Originally posted by washed up contractor View Post
    If you believe hammond is going to introduce the public sector IR35 'changes' to the private sector on the 22nd (although implementation would likely be April 2018) then Id say go for it.
    That's the Elephant in the room isn't it.

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  • northernladyuk
    replied
    Originally posted by northernladuk View Post
    No brainer for me. Take it, give it 6 months and see and then go from there.
    I tried this a couple of years ago. Didn't work out, so handed in notice after three months and went back to contracting.

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  • SlipTheJab
    replied
    Originally posted by pr1 View Post
    is that or "three quarters" or "three to four"? if the latter definitely take the WFH...
    The latter . Am mulling it over.

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  • pr1
    replied
    Originally posted by SlipTheJab View Post
    I'm commuting 3/4 hrs a day on average
    is that or "three quarters" or "three to four"? if the latter definitely take the WFH...

    Leave a comment:


  • Eirikur
    replied
    Had a similar offer last summer, declined it as the hiring manager was a presumptuous, haughty, condescending, self-satisfied, stuck-up, arrogant, overbearing, supercilious, high-handed, superior, pedantic a-hole and I knew for sure I would be leaving within 3 months (of course I had the luxury of having a contract offer on the table at the same time as well)

    Leave a comment:


  • SeanT
    replied
    Originally posted by TheFaQQer View Post
    If you have children who are of child benefit age, factor that into any cost consideration.
    Also savings interest, childcare vouchers, ability to take money out of your company at a sensible rate... but on the flipside, pension, holidays, healthcare, equity and maybe even paid sick leave...

    Leave a comment:

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