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  1. #21

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    TheFaQQer - scorchio!

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    I'm quite tempted just to stick some cash into Neil Woodford's new fund when that launches. If he can match what he's done in the past, I'll be pretty happy
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  2. #22

    Super poster

    pjclarke has more data than eek


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    Quote Originally Posted by SimonMac View Post
    I am still managing my SIPP with shares rather than just sticking them in funds, overall value is up 24.58% with a yield of 4.62% which I am more than happy with,

    Big winners:

    LLOY + 76%
    RMG + 57%
    AV + 54% (+62% with dividends)
    FGP + 24%

    Only losses are

    TSCO - 20% (-13% with dividends)
    BBY - 14% (-6% with dividends)

    Looking at SGRO, MARS and DLAR in my next round of purchases
    Yep, I'm in a similar happy place. Been a good year, mine's in a similar place. top 4 (with divis, over the lifetime of the holding, not just the last year):

    LLOY 62.41%
    UU 59.97%
    BARC 50.92%
    RMG 49.73%

    OK, LLOY is not strictly a High-yielder, but it was once and may be again, especially as my buy price was in the mid-thirties.

    Of 18 holdings, only HSBC shows a loss, of <1%. (Google shows VOD as being in -ve territory but thats only because the portfolio tool couldn't handle the rights issue thing)

    :-)
    The Pygmy Shrew of Wall St.

  3. #23

    TPAFKAk2p2

    mudskipper is a fount of knowledge

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFaQQer View Post
    I'm quite tempted just to stick some cash into Neil Woodford's new fund when that launches. If he can match what he's done in the past, I'll be pretty happy
    Yep - that's on my radar for my SIPP

  4. #24

    Contractor Among Contractors

    Jeebo72 is too good to be a permie

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    Quote Originally Posted by tractor View Post
    Are you now a legendary trader though?
    I am.

  5. #25

    Double Godlike!

    BlasterBates is NOT a disguised employee

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    Note that Woodford buys stuff no-one else wants, that's how to make money.

    Always look for stuff that has crashed big time.....however watch out for stuff that crashed for good reason, eg banks. They're not simply going to jump back to where they were. They were making money out of thin air in the 2000's so, their profits weren't really profits. virtually all banks had most of these "so called" profits wiped out in 2008. Internet boom was the same, if you check tech stocks after 2000 a lot of them flat lined for some time, and never really recovered their previous levels.

    The stuff to buy are the stocks that crash because the investors ran out of cash and had to sell their holdings , in 2008 that was basically everything that wasn't a bank.

    What happens in a rising stock market is investors borrow to buy stock (greed) and then the crash comes there's liquidity crisis and they have to sell at rock bottom prices. They know the stock will be up again in a years time but they've no choice because they have to have cash, they can't roll over their loans. This is where "cash" is king in a stock market crash. If you have cash hanging around you can go round and pick up stocks at rock bottom prices and make a killing.

    Funds can't do that, they can't sit there saying "hey we're hanging around with your cash until the next crash".

    This is where a lone investor can do well. Just wait..........

    My view is that you want about 20-30% cash so that if a crash occurs you can wade in.
    Last edited by BlasterBates; 29th May 2014 at 12:09.
    Author of the best seller "How to get Poor quickly"

  6. #26

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    tractor 's job has never been outsourced

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlasterBates View Post
    Note that Woodford buys stuff no-one else wants, that's how to make money.

    Always look for stuff that has crashed big time.....however watch out for stuff that crashed for good reason, eg banks. They're going nowhere in my opinion. They were making money out of thin air in the 2000's so, their profits weren't really profits. virtually all banks had most of these "so called" profits wiped out in 2008. Internet boom was the same, if you check tech stocks after 2000 most of them flat lined, and are still flat lining.

    The stuff to buy are the stocks that crash because the investors ran out of cash and had to sell their holdings , in 2008 that was basically everything that wasn't a bank.

    What happens in a rising stock market is investors borrow to buy stock (greed) and then the crash comes there's liquidity crisis and they have to sell at rock bottom prices. They know the stock will be up again in a years time but they've no choice because they have to have cash, they can't roll over their loans. This is where "cash" is king in a stock market crash. If you have cash hanging around you can go round and pick up stocks at rock bottom prices and make a killing.

    Funds can't do that, they can't sit there saying "hey we're hanging around with your cash until the next crash".

    This is where a lone investor can do well. Just wait..........
    This is why the average 'dart thrown at a newspaper' is likely to outperform the average fund

  7. #27

    TPAFKAk2p2

    mudskipper is a fount of knowledge

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    Well I've chucked in £1500 so will wait and see what happens...

  8. #28

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    lukemg is a permanent contractor


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    Ok, bit worried about some of the comments on here, please be careful and consider a BIG foundation of low-cost index trackers as your core investments (I use ETF's to avoid HL charges)
    Second - there is zero point in posting your gains on a few lucky punts on here without doing a close comparison with what you would have got from sticking the same amount in e.g. FTSE 100 tracker on the same date.
    I use Chart Tool | FE Trustnet

    to see how I get on.
    Answer - although my investments are averaging 13% per annum return across individual shares, index trackers, managed funds etc when I look at the analysis I would currently be about 1% better off overall if I had just chucked it in a FTSE 100 tracker on the exact same dates.
    I am glad to be that close to be honest and I enjoy the process and so will keep some shares and I especially like seeing the dividends pour in.
    Watch the psychology also, anyone can make money in this bull market, few can hold their nerve when everything kicks down 30%, not sell and maybe even pile more cash in.
    GLA

  9. #29

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    SimonMac - scorchio!

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    Quote Originally Posted by lukemg View Post
    Ok, bit worried about some of the comments on here, please be careful and consider a BIG foundation of low-cost index trackers as your core investments (I use ETF's to avoid HL charges)
    Second - there is zero point in posting your gains on a few lucky punts on here without doing a close comparison with what you would have got from sticking the same amount in e.g. FTSE 100 tracker on the same date.
    I use Chart Tool | FE Trustnet

    to see how I get on.
    Answer - although my investments are averaging 13% per annum return across individual shares, index trackers, managed funds etc when I look at the analysis I would currently be about 1% better off overall if I had just chucked it in a FTSE 100 tracker on the exact same dates.
    I am glad to be that close to be honest and I enjoy the process and so will keep some shares and I especially like seeing the dividends pour in.
    Watch the psychology also, anyone can make money in this bull market, few can hold their nerve when everything kicks down 30%, not sell and maybe even pile more cash in.
    GLA
    I started my SIPP in Nov 2012, since then the FTSE is up about 29%, I am up about 65%, I know its too early to be thinking in terms of annual return, but looking at my yield its 4.62% which is the number I am interested in, my Aviva holding has gone up over 50% but as I am looking at dividends rather than growth I am not that fussed if it drops back down again as long term as long as the yield is appealing
    “Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones.”

    ― Marcus Aurelius

  10. #30

    Still gathering requirements...

    rich2476 is too good to be a permie


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    I have just bought in Sirrus Minerals... bit of a higher risk share but some good returns on offer if planning permission for the mine in the UK is granted

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