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  1. #41

    キツネの帽子をかぶる

    WTFH's Avatar
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    Default Contract Renewal - what to do?

    Most clients don't care what the agency % is. They see a contractor and the rate they pay an agency for that contractor.
    A few clients set a % rate for agents.
    In my limited experience (only going back to the 1990s), I have never worked for a client who set the agent's %.
    ...but my clients have all been private sector large manufacturing/construction/medical businesses, so I may not know the field you are in.
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  2. #42

    キツネの帽子をかぶる

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    Default Contract Renewal - what to do?

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperZ View Post
    Most clients could and should use their own HR departments and save some £. Most clients chuck some kind of job spec at the agency, they don't approach them for advice IMO.
    MOST clients HR departments are clueless at best. When it comes to finding a toilet cleaner, they might be able to advertise and interview themselves, but if you're talking about IT jobs, they are useless - they either advertise directly in the wrong media, or go to their preferred agent for HR staff. Only to discover said agent has no idea about IT either.

    The benefits a "good" agent provides for a client is that they should understand the role, have an existing list of contractors who can fulfill that role without needing to advertise it, and if they must advertise, they know where to advertise. They also know the kind of rates that the role commands. If the client HR says £100 a day, the agent might explain that the normal rate for that level is £400, but you could get a junior for £200.

    (Edit: I can't believe I am standing up for agents, but they have their uses!)
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  3. #43

    I live on CUK

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    Quote Originally Posted by WTFH View Post
    Most clients don't care what the agency % is. They see a contractor and the rate they pay an agency for that contractor.
    A few clients set a % rate for agents.
    In my limited experience (only going back to the 1990s), I have never worked for a client who set the agent's %.
    ...but my clients have all been private sector large manufacturing/construction/medical businesses, so I may not know the field you are in.
    It is more of a newer thing for clients to insist on the margins for contractors. I've also found some clients insist that contractors are paid within a certain time frame.

    These additional things are often added in if the client has had issues with agencies in the past e.g. they have had contractors down tools.

    My clients who have done this have been in the private sector - consulting, finance and defence - and government sector. The private sector where large and medium sized enterprises.
    "You’re just a bad memory who doesn’t know when to go away" JR

  4. #44

    Should post faster

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    Back in my permie world, one of my our contractors wanted an increase in their day rate.

    We eventually decided on giving the agency an £n rise, with the agency then taking a smaller cut.

    Result being the contractor got his increase through a mixture of a lower agency % and a slightly larger day rate. Everything is negotiable.

  5. #45

    Nervous Newbie


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    Quote Originally Posted by l35kee View Post
    Back in my permie world, one of my our contractors wanted an increase in their day rate.

    We eventually decided on giving the agency an £n rise, with the agency then taking a smaller cut.

    Result being the contractor got his increase through a mixture of a lower agency % and a slightly larger day rate. Everything is negotiable.
    I have done similar in my own permie days - we wanted one of our contractors to get a rise, which I secured budget for, but agreed with agency that the extra would all go to the contractor rather than the agency getting a raise themselves thereby cutting in to the contractor's rate.

    Agency were happy enough to oblige in order to stay in our good books and avoid contractor leaving in search of a better rate elsewhere, esp. as they still got the same amount in cash terms despite the % dropping.

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