Mobbing/Bullying?
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  1. #21

    Respect my authoritah!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SueEllen View Post
    It's when everyone in a workplace gangs up on you.
    Yes, I know what it is. However, I never encountered the word in that context until 2002 when I started working with Germans. This is the first time I've seen it in use among English speakers. Germans use it to mean bullying in general - they don't really have another word that encapsulates the concept. (Just as there's no real German word for "courtesy" which explains a lot...)

    Hmm. Originated in Sweden, but among UK psychologists the phrase "workplace bullying" is more common. Little snippet from the wikipedia article should be an encouragment to the OP.

    "Adams and Field believe that mobbing is typically found in work environments that have poorly organised production or working methods and incapable or inattentive management and that mobbing victims are usually "exceptional individuals who demonstrated intelligence, competence, creativity, integrity, accomplishment and dedication""
    You won. Get over it.

    --drunk on abuse of power--

  2. #22

    Fingers like lightning


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    Quote Originally Posted by northernladuk View Post
    Well they did say they're feeling sick and can't face the place. Best avoided but what they heck, if it gets them out of there for a few days to de-stress while still serving the notice period, why not? . Turn up on last day....with cakes
    Personally I'd probably serve notice and then spend the next week winding them all up, but this stuff never happens to me. I;ve been lucky, always worked with good peeps who luf working with me

  3. #23

    Nervous Newbie


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    Thanks for most of the decent responses so far. No one has mentioned the IR35 situation also where I am being treated an employee - is the client likely to understand what IR35 even is? This is a tricky situation also as if I bring it up they may think I am trying to cause more issues if they don't have a clue. The problem with even working the notice period is that everyone is likely to find out either I was given notice or I have given notice and permie girl will make life as difficult as possible the last week.

  4. #24

    Old Greg is my bitch's bitch

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    Quote Originally Posted by Northernercontractor View Post
    If I decide to walk, can they withhold payment for the days that I have worked as I noticed that my recent time-sheet wasn't approved for some reason?
    If you're walking, give notice and seek agreement to waive notice period. Be professional, shake their hands and wish them well, wrap things up neatly and learn your lesson. Absolutely make sure you get paid for every day worked.
    Where there's muck there's brass.

  5. #25

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    For those suggesting to 'man up', go and have a long look at yourselves. We all might be self employed super heroes but that doesn't stop being hurt on a personal level.

    I had a contract a few years ago where everything was blamed on me. It was awful and wouldn't with it on anyone.

  6. #26

    Nervous Newbie


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    Quote Originally Posted by SussexSeagull View Post
    For those suggesting to 'man up', go and have a long look at yourselves. We all might be self employed super heroes but that doesn't stop being hurt on a personal level.

    I had a contract a few years ago where everything was blamed on me. It was awful and wouldn't with it on anyone.
    Thanks for understanding SussexSeagull. I have been contracting for many years and this is the first time this has happened to me. I am fully competent and a likeable person (Im a northerner!) so I was very shocked at my treatment here. But I can only move on and learn from the experience.

  7. #27

    Fingers like lightning


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    Quote Originally Posted by Northernercontractor View Post
    Thanks for most of the decent responses so far. No one has mentioned the IR35 situation also where I am being treated an employee - is the client likely to understand what IR35 even is? This is a tricky situation also as if I bring it up they may think I am trying to cause more issues if they don't have a clue. The problem with even working the notice period is that everyone is likely to find out either I was given notice or I have given notice and permie girl will make life as difficult as possible the last week.
    Not being funny but you made your bed in this instance by going to the director so just man up ask for a meeting tomorrow to see how they feel things are going if they indicate not well ask if they want you to leave & do so. At least you get paid some notice that way.

    Its going to be very hard to turn this around quite frankly it is not even worth doing so either as for IR35 that's your issue not theirs if they want to be awkward they could always use the whistle blower immunity law & report you direct to HMRC anonymously! Sure you do not want that either do you. https://www.gov.uk/whistleblowing/wh...-whistleblower

  8. #28

    Nervous Newbie


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    Quote Originally Posted by uk contractor View Post
    Not being funny but you made your bed in this instance by going to the director so just man up ask for a meeting tomorrow to see how they feel things are going if they indicate not well ask if they want you to leave & do so. At least you get paid some notice that way.

    Its going to be very hard to turn this around quite frankly it is not even worth doing so either as for IR35 that's your issue not theirs if they want to be awkward they could always use the whistle blower immunity law & report you direct to HMRC anonymously! Sure you do not want that either do you. https://www.gov.uk/whistleblowing/wh...-whistleblower
    I didn't see an issue with going to the director as its an open door policy where I work and the director is usually in amongst employees and contractors anyway - it wasn't as if no one goes to the director for advice or a chat so there shouldn't have been an issue with that. I have already asked for a meeting on Friday which is planned for Tuesday so it's not about manning up.

  9. #29

    I live on CUK

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    Quote Originally Posted by Northernercontractor View Post
    I didn't see an issue with going to the director as its an open door policy where I work
    and the director is usually in amongst employees and contractors anyway - it wasn't as if no one goes to the director for advice or a chat so there shouldn't have been an issue with that. I have already asked for a meeting on Friday which is planned for Tuesday so it's not about manning up.
    This shows how naive you are. Open door policies are a load of bulltulip - they are used to bully people out of companies.

    In future if all the permies agree some tulip way is the right way to do something get it documented and do it. If that tulip way is criminal or fraud then you get yourself out of the contract asap without doing it and most importantly without making waves.

    Anyway find out if you can leave on Tuesday, and don't give a feck about the permies.
    "You’re just a bad memory who doesn’t know when to go away" JR

  10. #30

    Godlike

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    Apologise for any offence caused. Stress it was not your intention and explain you are only trying to do the best job you can to ensure the company get their monies worth.

    Mainly do not get emotional but be as logical as possible, speak in a calm clear voice - if you do find you have a tendency to become animated then sit on your hands or simply be aware of what you are doing.

    If you do have this meeting plan for it and stick to your points do not get dragged into other side issues which are not relevant.

    Do not rely on your personality it is not what the client pays for.

    Good luck.

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