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Thread: Changing course

  1. #21

    More time posting than coding


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    People skills, perception of your surroundings & how you need to interact with the existing status quo are all highly valuable skills which cannot be taught academically they can only be learned by doing & having commercial experience of different teams & cultures. Most technical skills can usually be learned but the people skills are what allows experienced contractors to keep on billing!!

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by uk contractor View Post
    People skills, perception of your surroundings & how you need to interact with the existing status quo are all highly valuable skills which cannot be taught academically they can only be learned by doing & having commercial experience of different teams & cultures. Most technical skills can usually be learned but the people skills are what allows experienced contractors to keep on billing!!
    Or you could offshore it for much cheapness and forget all that
    'CUK forum personality of 2011' - Winner - Yes really!!!!

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by yetanotherbob View Post
    This is a recurring pattern now - over and over.
    I take up a typical contract offer - I figure out the technology and environment way faster than others (and usually way better than those who have been there for years).
    This leads to all sorts of issues as the more established bums on seats start feeling threatened.
    They happily extract as much as possible from me (solutions, insights, knowledge - which I freely document and share) but I am then accused of not being a "team player" (which I realise is a euphemism for: either don't see through all the BS or if you do, just play along. "play the game").

    How does one break in to a more niche and specialist type of contracting (if it exists) where one can "get in, get the job done, get out" and not have to deal with all the unnecessary baggage.
    Pull in your own work and charge for deliverables.

    Ready about - lee Ho!

  4. #24

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    OP - no offence but it sounds like your giving the wrong impressions.

    Here's my take....

    Client has got a contractor on board because they need or think they need someone to help with something. If they've asked for someone to come in, rip it all apart and start again then fair enough. If they want someone to come in and do something else then do that.

    No client in the world is going to happy with a contractor who comes in and starts tearing it all apart even if they are 100% right. Its will likely upset the permies in the first place. You could be a world leading expert on a subject but if you come in and make one of the permies whos been there 20 years look bad, and they start whinging to management, you'll be out the door.

    Even if you know 100x more than the permies (not difficult in a lot of places) do not make it obvious. It will upset them. Not saying don't make suggestions to improve things but you've got to be careful.

    On the flip side, if you're helpful to permies, get along with them, and don't cause grief this can go an awful long way. Remember you're coming in, earning tons more than them so its worth showing them that you're a decent person to work alongside.

    In the past, I've had contracts extended when it looked like they wouldn't have been because the permies would rather I was there than not. In this case, they kicked off about the workload if I went.
    Rhyddid i lofnod psychocandy!!!!

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by psychocandy View Post
    OP - no offence but it sounds like your giving the wrong impressions.

    Here's my take....

    Client has got a contractor on board because they need or think they need someone to help with something. If they've asked for someone to come in, rip it all apart and start again then fair enough. If they want someone to come in and do something else then do that.

    No client in the world is going to happy with a contractor who comes in and starts tearing it all apart even if they are 100% right. Its will likely upset the permies in the first place. You could be a world leading expert on a subject but if you come in and make one of the permies whos been there 20 years look bad, and they start whinging to management, you'll be out the door.

    Even if you know 100x more than the permies (not difficult in a lot of places) do not make it obvious. It will upset them. Not saying don't make suggestions to improve things but you've got to be careful.

    On the flip side, if you're helpful to permies, get along with them, and don't cause grief this can go an awful long way. Remember you're coming in, earning tons more than them so its worth showing them that you're a decent person to work alongside.

    In the past, I've had contracts extended when it looked like they wouldn't have been because the permies would rather I was there than not. In this case, they kicked off about the workload if I went.
    Sometimes the client does not know what they want or need.
    They need to be told.

    That's where your simple rounding up of the perceived situation falls apart.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMarkyMark View Post
    Sometimes the client does not know what they want or need.
    They need to be told.

    That's where your simple rounding up of the perceived situation falls apart.
    Ahh but to work out whether to do what PC or you say, you need people skills....
    "You’re just a bad memory who doesn’t know when to go away" JR

  7. #27

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    I feel like I'm stuck in a kind of Cassandra Complex sometimes. I have a very good instinct for what's technically right, and this is usually proved by the way things turn out. The problem is, I'm often not very good at articulating why I'm right, so sometimes my approach is rejected. I then have to stand back and watch things go to tulip, knowing if it had been done my way a load of problems could have been avoided. I've learnt that all I can do is politely give my opinion, hope it's accepted, and not to say 'I told you so'.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by pauldee View Post
    I feel like I'm stuck in a kind of Cassandra Complex sometimes. I have a very good instinct for what's technically right, and this is usually proved by the way things turn out. The problem is, I'm often not very good at articulating why I'm right, so sometimes my approach is rejected. I then have to stand back and watch things go to tulip, knowing if it had been done my way a load of problems could have been avoided. I've learnt that all I can do is politely give my opinion, hope it's accepted, and not to say 'I told you so'.
    Rejected.
    'CUK forum personality of 2011' - Winner - Yes really!!!!

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by northernladuk View Post
    Or you could offshore it for much cheapness and forget all that
    Or you could onshore it here in London!!

  10. #30

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