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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by pr1 View Post
    that's illegal (agencies are just immoral)
    Short of trying to find out the seller's contact information and going direct, how would you know? I'm fairly certain this happened to me on the flat I bought in Glasgow ten years ago, but given the location and the a market at the time it was suck it up or don't make the move.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by seanraaron View Post
    Short of trying to find out the seller's contact information and going direct, how would you know? I'm fairly certain this happened to me on the flat I bought in Glasgow ten years ago, but given the location and the a market at the time it was suck it up or don't make the move.
    https://www.gov.uk/buy-sell-your-home/estate-agents

    Estate agents must also treat buyers fairly. They must show any offers promptly and in writing to the person selling the house.

    Estate agents are also legally obliged to pass on any other offers for the property right up to when contracts are exchanged.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by pr1 View Post
    https://www.gov.uk/buy-sell-your-home/estate-agents

    Estate agents must also treat buyers fairly. They must show any offers promptly and in writing to the person selling the house.

    Estate agents are also legally obliged to pass on any other offers for the property right up to when contracts are exchanged.
    Well being the upstanding individuals they are, I'm sure they follow the letter of the law at all times.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seanraaron View Post
    Well being the upstanding individuals they are, I'm sure they follow the letter of the law at all times.
    Not saying they do/don't it, just saying it's illegal so you can pursue it (i.e. it's not like agencies)

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    Quote Originally Posted by pr1 View Post
    Not saying they do/don't it, just saying it's illegal so you can pursue it (i.e. it's not like agencies)
    Think I missed statute on that. Back then though they were still taking multiple offers on sealed bids, so I doubt any property was on the market long enough to make it a big risk. Since the crash, there's no way it would happen. Took six months to sell that place after the divorce.

  6. #16

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    Back on topic guys n gals please.
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  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by northernladuk View Post
    Back on topic guys n gals please.
    Apologies. I think the point stands: just suck it up or walk. Approaching the client direct might not leave them with a great feeling/opinion of you so I wouldn't bother pushing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SimonMac View Post
    Its very common, the reasons can be many, reduction in budget is a common excuse as its passing the blame to the Client.

    You could ask the agent if they took a reduction in their rate too, and if so how much, but you will never get an answer, although what is not said or the say something is said on a phone call usually answers the question for you.

    Away from the obvious agent wants a bigger margin, it could be two candidates are put though and one is cheaper than the other, the agent thinks you are a better bet than the other guy so if you can be put though at 25 a day less but last 6 months longer than the other candidate you are better value for them. Also if its a new project the budget might not have been signed off before the advert went out so the PM might have over estimated what he can afford to pay, so the reason given by the agent could be 100% genuine. Lastly there is always the chance that the client might not thing you are worth the higher rate, if you are new to contracting that is a big risk to them which has to be factored in

    As others have said (and you alluded to yourself) if your not fussed to take the job walk away and see if the 25 can come back, but 550 now is better than 575 tomorrow.
    Sounds like a banking rate; most banks now have commission structures in place that are completely transparent rather than the agent getting a budget and making whatever margin they felt they could, which led to a lot of hostility in the past (typically either they're on a percentage of day rate to reflect the calibre of client or a fixed fee, i.e. x/day).
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  9. #19

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    Today cost you 22 days * the lost 25 just to make up one days rate, in looking for another contract for 2 weeks will take you a year to make back up to 575 in lost business

    Bird in the hand and all that

    Remember to factor in 10% rate cuts and 30+ days compulsory leave etc

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    You will not find out if the agency would like a higher margin or whether the customer is limiting the budget.

    Negotiation is a game of chicken.

    Do you feel lucky ?

    I have to say when the agent originally says it's 550 it would not be unusual for this to happen. Personally I would be a lot tougher if the agent had originally said 575.

    If the market is bouyant and you are confident you'll have something within a week, you can turn him down. If you are on the bench for two weeks however for a 6 month contract you will be out of pocket if you turn it down.

    Hard nosed business decision optimising your income is probably to accept.
    Author of the best seller "How to get Poor quickly"

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